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Dr. Mendese Inducted as Board Member of Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology


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News & Press

Our own Mohs Surgeon, Dr. Gary Mendese has recently been bestowed the honor of being voted in as a board member of the Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology. A Massachusetts resident, Mendese was elected by fellow members of the Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology at their most recent meeting in late September.

The Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology is the professional society for more than 300 practicing dermatologists. It is committed to advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical, and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair, and nails, advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin.

This is exciting news and we’re all very proud of Dr. Mendese and his continued commitment to his dermatological practice and dedication to providing his patients with the utmost care.

Said Mendese: “I am really happy to have been elected to the board of the Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology by its members, and am humbled to have the opportunity to have a more active role in the academy. What this means is I am now an active part of a group that helps cultivate the Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology and serve as a voice on behalf of the membership moving forward. The board of directors is involved with obtaining speakers for the meetings as well as other educational programs offered to the members. We are also hoping to incorporate some community outreach as well. I’m looking forward to helping serve the Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology as it’s a great resource for my peers, and the dermatological practice in general.”

Oct 20 // 2016

Our own Mohs Surgeon, Dr. Gary Mendese has recently been bestowed the honor of being voted in as a board member of the Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology. A Massachusetts resident, Mendese was elected by fellow members of the Massachusetts Academy of Dermatology at their most recent meeting in late September.

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Our October Spa Event is Right Around the Corner


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News & Press

Don’t forget!

On October 13th from 5:30 – 7:00 PM, we will be hosting our fall spa event and open house. Attendees will be able to enjoy an array of delicious food and drinks, as well as live demonstrations. There will also be raffles, and generous savings on cosmetic procedures, spa treatments, and professional beauty products. This is 

an excellent opportunity to come in and learn about the vast array of cosmetic services we offer in an atmosphere that encourages you to get social and have some fun! As always, attendance is free. This is open to GUYS and Gals!

We’ll be showcasing a new filler called Juvéderm VOLBELLA, which is a brand new injectable that helps plump up lips and smooth out lines and wrinkles around the mouth as hyaluronic acid within the gel attracts and retains moisture. Come learn more about it.

Reservations can be made by visiting info@dermskinhealth.com or by calling 603-742-5556.

Oct 05 // 2016

Don’t forget!

On October 13th from 5:30 – 7:00 PM, we will be hosting our fall spa event and open house.

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Lightening the Load: The Pivotal Role of the Medical Scribe


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News & Press

The American College of Medical Scribe Specialists estimates that by the year 2020, 100,000 medical scribes will be employed by myriad healthcare organizations around the country. This is good news for not only those that are on the hunt for a position writing in the medical industry, but it’s good for the physicians utilizing a medical scribe’s services, as well as for the patient, who will receive the undivided attention from their doctor and get more out of their office appointments. The utilization of a medical scribe is also great for health organizations because it boosts the productivity of the providers, leaving room to see more patients in a given day.

Medical scribes are employed to take much of the clerical workload associated with federally mandated Electronic Health Records (EHR) off of doctors as they see and diagnose patients throughout the workday. Scribes aide physicians with such tasks as EHR navigation, retrieval of diagnostic results, documentation of visits, and applicable medical coding.

Dermatology and Skin Health in Dover recently became one of the first dermatology practices in the state of New Hampshire to employ a medical scribe to help facilitate the growing demand of EHR files, and to enable the practice to better the overall experience of their patients. Below you’ll get an inside look at a “day-in-the-life” with Derm Skin’s own medical scribe, and recent University of New Hampshire graduate, Parker Woolley:

What does a medical scribe do? Walk us through a typical day…

Woolley: My shift is from 8-5 with an hour lunch break from 12-1. My whole job is to free up Dr. Alissa Lamoureux from the electronic medical record system, so that she can pay 100% attention to the patient. I am essentially the middleman between the physician and the medical record. I record all of the diagnoses, prescriptions, symptoms, biopsies, lab orders, follow-ups, and other typical medical information that happens during a dermatology visit.

How long have you been scribing for?

Woolley: I started my position as a medical scribe in June of 2016. I had been accepted to ScribeAmerica, which is essentially a nation wide collection of medical scribes, to scribe in Boston. However, Laurie Seavey, the practice manager of Dermatology and Skin Health, asked me if I would like to come on board as a medical scribe. Last summer I had interned for Laurie's non-profit organization for skin cancer prevention called Make Big Change, so I was already familiar with the practice and the great staff that works at Dermatology and Skin Health. I quickly said ‘yes’ and began medical scribing within a week or two.

Are there any associated technologies that you utilize?

Woolley: Dermatology and Skin Health utilize the software Modernizing Medicine (www.modmed.com). This software is incredibly user-friendly and very intuitive. The whole office uses the OS X operating system made by Apple. This means that everyone uses either iMac Desktops or iPads. I myself use an iPad, which contains 1,700 diagnoses, 400 histories, 400 plans, 1,000 anatomical parts and 25,000 high-resolution medical images.

What do you enjoy about your position at Dermatology and Skin Health?

Woolley: I enjoy learning while working at Dermatology and Skin Health. It blows my mind how much Dr. Lamoureux knows and I feel very comfortable asking her any questions I have about the visit, diagnoses, prescriptions, and so forth. I have definitely learned quite a bit about dermatology during my time working at the clinic. I can honestly say that I learn something new every single day I am here. Even after my shift today I learned about a new procedure that involves injecting deoxycholic acid (Kybella) into the area underneath the chin to essentially destroy adipose cells (fat cells). This procedure can help alleviate the appearance of the double chin.

How did you learn about medical scribing and what it was/entailed? Was it a profession you sought out, or is it something more of a useful tool to get you more experience in a medical environment? 

Woolley: I recently graduated from the University of New Hampshire with a major in Finance and a concentration in Pre-Medical Studies. Over the years I have basically heard of every single job/position that has to do with healthcare. I knew that I wanted to gain more experience before applying to medical school, but at the same time needed a job that was relatively easy to enter into (compared to other medical professions). I believe this was a good choice for me because I am still studying for the new, revamped MCAT that I plan to take in late winter/early spring of 2017.

I have learned way more than I had anticipated and to a much greater degree as well. I think that this job provides an invaluable experience and insight into what a dermatologist does. Dr. Lamoureux also underwent an internal medicine residency, so from time-to-time I am able to learn a little bit about that specialty as well.

How long did it take to become a trained medical scribe?

Woolley: I did not do any didactic training to become a medical scribe, other than what I learned in my undergraduate biology and biochemistry classes. I trained in the practice using the software for about ten days with Sunny Wencek and Angela Kneeland, two medical assistants at Dermatology and Skin Health. Previously they had been rooming the patient in conjunction with medical scribing for Dr. Lamoureux. They did a great job orienting me and making sure I knew the ropes during my training.

What do you, as a medical scribe, add to the overall medical care experience of a patient?

Woolley: I think it is important that the patient does not feel ignored or unimportant during their visit. Everyone, at least once, has gone to see the doctor, whether it be for a annual check-up or a more specialized visit, only to have the doctor facing away, typing on the keyboard or staring down at a clipboard on their lap, documenting what is going on throughout the course of the visit. The physician does not mean to be rude, but the body language that corresponds to these documentation periods can make the patient feel like their symptoms are being downplayed.

If one were to observe my body language during a visit with the patient, they would see that 80% of the time my eyes are glued to the iPad and my fingers are furiously typing in documentation that Dr. Lamoureux has spoken aloud. I typically only look up to pinpoint the exact measurement and location of her biopsies, diagnoses, and observations. If one were to watch Dr. Lamoureux throughout the visit, they would see that 99% of the time her eyes are on the patient, either making eye-contact or looking into her dermatoscope to decipher whether or not a location is benign or malignant.

What do you add to the overall working experience of a physician that you’re scribing for? In other words, what is the benefit of having a medical scribe on staff?

Woolley: After the visit has ended and the patient has left for the checkout window, Dr. Lamoureux will look at the entry I have made in the patient's medical record. She is the final say in the note and makes sure all the prescriptions are correct, the diagnoses are accurate, and that nothing was missed during the visit. There was a slight learning curve in the beginning of my training, but for the most part I have become proficient at documenting the encounter. I suppose that my job may not be necessary for every patient that comes into the clinic. Typically, suture removals and Botox follow-ups are relatively straightforward. The majority of patients are very satisfied with the way their wounds from excisions are healing. The patients who have cosmetic procedures, such as Botox, are almost unanimously extremely happy with the results. These two types of visits typically require little documentation, because the majority of it was done in the prior visit. However, when patients come in for full-checks, the documentation can become exhaustive. It obviously depends from patient to patient, but some can have dozens of benign nevi and/or seborrheic keratoses, both of which are harmless, normal conditions of many skin types. All of these spots are documented and there are obviously many more diagnoses that can add up from patient to patient, such as: cherry angiomas, telangiectasias, lentigos, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, fibrous papules, basal cells, squamous cells, melanomas, intradermal nevi, xerosis, pruritus, tick bites, ecchymosis, and the list goes on... I guess in short, I take some of the "behind-the-scenes" workload off for Dr. Lamoureux. There’s a lot of value in that – enabling the physician to put the entirety of their focus on the patient.

 

 

Aug 25 // 2016

Medical scribes are employed to take much of the clerical workload associated with federally mandated Electronic Health Records (EHR) off of doctors as they see and diagnose patients throughout the workday. Scribes aide physicians with such tasks as EHR navigation, retrieval of diagnostic results, documentation of visits, and applicable medical coding.

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Dermatology and Skin Health Recognized as “Best Dermatologist” in Seacoast Media Group’s 2016 Readers’ Choice Awards


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News & Press

We’re so proud to announce today that we’ve been selected as a “winner” of the 2016 Seacoast Media Group’s Readers’ Choice Award for Best Dermatologist. 

The Readers' Choice Awards celebrates the best of businesses, organizations, people and more that take residence here in the greater seacoast area. An online poll was open for public voting on Seacoast Media Group’s website from May 30th to June 12th, allowing community members to anonymously chime in and vote for their favorites.

We just wanted to take a moment to express how grateful we truly are for the recognition. It’s been a bit of a trying year for us in light of losing our beloved leader and founder Dr. James L. Campbell. But, in staying true to his legacy, we’ve pushed forward and are offering the same compassionate, patient focused care in an environment that fosters comfort, betterment, and advanced skin cancer detection and treatment. We’ve always put you, our patient’s, first, so we’re truly humbled for this honor and for your continued support of our practice.

We’re dedicated to your skin’s health, and we’re feeling the love in return. It feels great! Thanks.

We’ll see you soon! 

Aug 02 // 2016

We’re so proud to announce today that we’ve been selected as a “winner” of the 2016 Seacoast Media Group’s Readers’ Choice Award for Best Dermatologist.

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Mohs College vs. Mohs Society


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It’s 2016. Skin cancer diagnoses have been on the rise for quite some time now. That bronzed look that sunbathers have long been seeking is now being talked about at length in regards to the danger it poses on your health. And, even in dire attempts to educate people about the effects of UV radiation from the sun and other sources such as tanning beds, the issue still looms large and prevention measures need to be proactively sought and taught.

With the cases of skin cancers popping up at inflated rates, we have also seen an influx in remediation efforts to remove skin cancers with hopes of interrupting the spread of the disease, which, as we know, can ultimately lead to death. Therefore, it’s not a task to be taken lightly. When it comes to the removal of existing cancer cells, you want the practice and the professional that is going to do the best job for you and your health.

Enter Mohs micrographic surgery.

Developed by Dr. Frederick Mohs in the 1930s, Mohs micrographic surgery has, with a few refinements, come to be embraced over the past decade by an increasing number of surgeons for an ever-widening variety of skin cancers.

Today, Mohs surgery has come to be accepted as the single most effective technique for removing Basal Cell Carcinomas and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (BCCs and SCCs), the two most common skin cancers. It accomplishes the nifty trick of sparing the greatest amount of healthy tissue while also most completely expunging cancer cells; cure rates for BCC and SCC are an unparalleled 98 percent or higher with Mohs, significantly better than the rates for standard excision or any other accepted method.

Now that we have that on the table, we wanted to discuss the distinct differences in how a dermatologist can go about becoming a “Mohs Certified Surgeon.”

There are two routes. One is by way of the American College of Mohs Surgery; the other is via the American Society for Mohs Surgery. The detail of how a surgeon earned their certification is often lost in translation and is a minute detail overlooked by a vast majority of skin cancer patients. So, allow us to give you a quick synopsis.

 

American College of Mohs Surgery:

First things first – The American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS) was actually founded by Dr. Frederick Mohs himself back in 1967.

Fellows enrolled in the American College of Mohs Surgery undergo an intensive training curriculum. After completing their residency in dermatology, a physician can apply to participate in an ACMS-approved fellowship-training program. Qualified applicants, who have passed an extremely competitive review and selection process, undergo a 1- to 2-year training program that includes operative and non-operative education, pathology, tumor reconstruction, as well as exposure to long-term results, recurrences, and complications.

Each fellow-in-training is paired with an accredited, veteran ACMS surgeon who has demonstrated proficiency and expertise in Mohs surgery. The fellow-in-training receives direct Mohs surgery guidance and mentoring for the duration of the program.

To complete an ACMS-approved fellowship, a physician must:

  • Participate in a minimum of 500 Mohs surgery cases during fellowship (surgeries during residency do not count)

  • Learn to accurately interpret slides of tissue samples that have been removed during Mohs surgery

  • Perform a wide breadth of reconstructions, ranging from simple closures to complicated multi-step repairs

The fellows who choose to participate in the fellowship training programs gain the unparalleled experience and judgment in their studies. The program is comprehensive and rigorous because skin cancer itself occurs in a diversity of forms, degrees, and areas of the body.

For more information visit: www.mohscollege.org

 

American Society for Mohs Surgery:

“The American Society for Mohs Surgery was founded in 1990 by a small group of dermatologists in Southern California, all of whom had received extensive Mohs training in Residency and had successfully integrated the Mohs technique into their practices. The ASMS was envisioned as a professional medical society that would provide important professional and educational support for the increasing number of Residency-trained Mohs surgeons throughout the country.” 

How do you become a certified member of the society?

You need to have completed your residency in dermatology or a related field – similar to the first requirement of the American College of Mohs Surgery. Then, along with $350, you need to fulfill the following requirements:

  • Documentation for a minimum of 75 Mohs cases performed as the primary Mohs surgeon. A maximum of 45 of these cases may have been performed as part of applicant's dermatology Residency training.

  • Two letters of character reference from other Board certified dermatologists.

  • Submission of two complete Mohs cases for evaluation, including glass slides, Mohs map, operative report and perioperative photographs. These cases must have been performed in applicant's post-Residency practice, and within the past two years.

  • Passing scores of seventy percent each on written and practical portions of ASMS Fellow examination. Exam is currently offered three times per year: during the winter AAD meeting, during the ASMS clinical symposium in May, and during the ASMS Fundamentals of Mohs Surgery course in November. Please see Upcoming Events calendar for exact dates and times.

  • Upon granting of Fellow membership, applicant is required to participate in the ASMS annual Peer Review program for four additional years.

  • Other Maintenance of Fellow membership requirements will apply following completion of mandatory four-year Peer Review participation.

This is a simple overview of “ACMS” and “ASMS” dermatologists practicing Mohs surgery. You as the patient have the right to know the “Mohs College difference” and sometimes this is difficult to comb through on your own.

For more information visit: www.mohssurgery.org

 

Lucky for us, our very own lead Mohs physician, Dr. Gary Mendese is an American College of Mohs Surgery Fellowship trained Mohs surgeon. It’s his dedication to his craft, and respect for the Mohs surgical practice that gives us a great deal of pride in being able to offer our patients the very best care in New Hampshire and beyond.

You’ve got options. And ultimately, it’s your choice to make. What we’ve done is just laid some facts on the table for you to consume and consider. At the end of the day, the most important thing for your skin health is getting your skin checked for cancerous lesions so that a cure is an option in the first place (if one is needed). If you’re not protecting yourself and keeping an eye on your skin, the consequences could be grave. 

Jul 27 // 2016

It’s 2016. Skin cancer diagnoses have been on the rise for quite some time now.

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Dermatology and Skin Health's Michelle Roy and Gary Mendese Prominently Feature in Dermatology Times Magazine


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News & Press

Happy 4th of July, everyone! While you’re out there barbequing, splashing around in the pool (or at the beach!), lounging in the yard, spending time with family, enjoying colorful displays of pyro-technology, etc., don’t forget to take care of that skin of yours!

Speaking of skincare, our own Physicians Assistant, Michelle Roy, and Mohs Surgeon, Gary Mendese were recently featured in Dermatology Times Magazine. Continuing the conversation about Make Big Change, and the overall strategy of offering and educating folks (and fellow dermatologists) about preventative measures when it comes to caring for your skin and combating the ill affects of the sun’s UV rays which (as most of you know) can lead to skin cancer.

As the article states:

New England has some of the highest skin cancer rates in the United States. According to Center for Disease Control and Prevention data from 2012, New Hampshire ranks in the top 10 U.S. states for melanoma incidence, with 24.8 cases per 100,000 population.

So while we preach to you, our local constituents, let us not forget that this is a global issue:

The World Health Organization reports:

The incidence of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers has been increasing over the past decades. Currently, between 2 and 3 million non-melanoma skin cancers and 132,000 melanoma skin cancers occur globally each year. One in every three cancers diagnosed is a skin cancer and, according to Skin Cancer Foundation Statistics, one in every five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime.

As ozone levels are depleted, the atmosphere loses more and more of its protective filter function and more solar UV radiation reaches the Earth's surface. It is estimated that a 10 per cent decrease in ozone levels will result in an additional 300,000 non-melanoma and 4,500 melanoma skin cancer cases. The global incidence of melanoma continues to increase – however, the main factors that predispose to the development of melanoma seem to be connected with recreational exposure to the sun and a history of sunburn. These factors lie within each individual's own responsibility.

In response, this article acts as a call-to-action for people far-and-wide to get involved, and help turn things around.

Check it out here: http://bit.ly/29i0QVA

And remember: SPF is Your BFF! 

For more on Make Big Change, click here.

Jul 01 // 2016

Our own Physicians Assistant, Michelle Roy, and Mohs Surgeon, Gary Mendese were recently featured in Dermatology Times Magazine. Continuing the conversation about Make Big Change, and the overall strategy of offering and educating folks (and fellow dermatologists) about preventative measures when it comes to caring for your skin and combating the ill affects of the sun’s UV rays which (as most of you know) can lead to skin cancer.

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Skin Health Medi-Spa Estheticians Oncology Certified


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News & Press

We are so pleased to let everyone know that our own Skin Health Medi-Spa recently had several of its very talented estheticians become oncology certified. This further bolsters our overall saturation in the remediation of skin cancer across the entirety of our facility here in Dover. We’re fully armed and ready to continue our mission of protecting, helping, and healing everyone in the greater seacoast, and throughout the Northeast.

Esthetics is defined as a “pleasing appearance or effect,” particularly to the sense of sight. For skin care and spa professionals, that means analyzing the skin condition and providing therapeutic treatments with the use of products and/or equipment to reach satisfactory results. Cancer therapies, particularly chemotherapy, present numerous skin conditions because of their toxicity to the body, with many manifestations on the skin. Therefore, oncology esthetics professionals are qualified to recognize related side effects and tailor the treatments accordingly. The field consists of specialists in the medical community who can recognize the demand for a spa treatment from their patients and support their requests.[1]

What does having oncology certified estheticians mean?

Well, it means a number of things. For one, it enables our estheticians the ability to spot abnormalities on the skin and be able to differentiate between cancerous and benign lesions and refer them upstairs to our medical team if the former is believed to be present. Another step in the right direction of early intervention.

What are the other skills obtained during the oncology certified training?

·      Knowing how to perform safe and professional skin care services on patients/clients currently going through chemo and or radiation treatments

·      Knowing what to recommend for beneficial cosmetic products for oncology patients/clients 

·      Knowing how to address skin conditions and reactions associated with oncology medications and therapies such as;

o   Mild epidermal dehydration

o   Dryness

o   Mild inflammation

·      Able to customize post-cancer clinical facial treatments that are designed on a case-by-case basis.

With credible training being provided to our licensed oncology esthetician personnel, we can help identify and bolster the benefits that oncology esthetics can offer a person living with cancer. The aim is to encourage esthetics treatments as an additional forms of therapy to help ease the disease’s effects on the skin.


[1]“Providing effective, holistic treatments to a new clientele in a safe environment.” - Les Nouvelles Esthétiques & Spa • September 2009 – www.lneonline.com

 

 

Jun 30 // 2016

With credible training being provided to our licensed oncology esthetician personnel, we can help identify and bolster the benefits that oncology esthetics can offer a person living with cancer. The aim is to encourage esthetics treatments as an additional forms of therapy to help ease the disease’s effects on the skin.

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Upcoming Spa Event – You're Invited!


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News & Press

On May 19th from 5:30 to 7:00 PM, we will be hosting our spring spa event and open house. Attendees will be able to enjoy an array of delicious food and drinks, as well as live demonstrations, raffles, and generous savings on cosmetic procedures, spa treatments, and professional beauty products. This is an excellent opportunity to come in and learn about the vast array of cosmetic services we offer in an atmosphere that encourages you to get social and have some fun! In addition, Dr. Lamoureux and Dr. Mendese will be here to introduce themselves as the newer members of our team, and the team behind our non-profit Make Big Change will have a table set up to provide information on the excellent work they are doing on behalf of skin cancer prevention. As always, attendance is free.

Reservations can be made by emailing info@dermskinhealth.com or by calling 603-742-5556.

May 17 // 2016

On May 19th from 5:30 – 7:00 PM, we will be hosting our spring spa event and open house.

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Service Announcement for Dr. Campbell


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News & Press

In response to the unexpected passing of our founder, Dr. James L. Campbell Jr. we wanted to keep our loyal patients, family, and friends abreast of a “celebration of life” that will be held in his honor from 5-8pm on Friday, May 6th at the Hellenic Center here in Dover. If Dr. Campbell had a positive impact on your life and you’d like to attend, please stop in and share in the moment with us during these hours.

Please note: space is extremely limited.

 

Apr 25 // 2016

In response to the unexpected passing of our founder, Dr. James L. Campbell Jr.

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Melanoma Awareness Month = Free Skin Cancer Screenings


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News & Press

The month of May is just around the corner, which as you may know, is now officially “Melanoma Awareness Month” in the state of New Hampshire. As one of the ways in which we will be honoring this proclamation, we have teamed up with two local area hospitals to provide skin cancer screenings completely free of charge.

As is true in many areas of health, but especially relevant in regards to cancers of the skin, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Numerous studies have shown that with early detection, these types of cancer can have a remarkably high treatment success rate. A study by the American Cancer Society informs us that by immediately identifying and properly treating Melanoma, the 5-year survival rate is 97%. However, when left unattended, the numbers drop dramatically. By the time the cancer has reached the lymph nodes, the survival rate falls to 62%. If it advances into distant organs, the chance of successful treatment is only 16%.

At Dermatology and Skin Health, we are deeply committed to the health of our patients, as well as the community as a whole. We have chosen to conduct these screenings as a way to continue to advocate for more widespread skin cancer awareness, and also as a way to provide access to care for those who may be currently experiencing financial difficulties that prevent them from attending a regular office visit.

The free screenings will take place at Wentworth-Douglass and Frisbee Memorial Hospitals on Monday, May 9th and again at Wentworth-Douglass on Wednesday, May 11th from 6:00-8:00 P.M. Exams will be performed by our team of professionals, including Dr. Alissa Lamoureux, Niki Bryn, APRN, and Michelle Roy, PA-C, who have all donated their time to this important cause. Although typically taking only about five minutes to perform, appointments are required, and will be managed through the hospitals’ administration. To schedule a screening at Wentworth-Douglass, please call: 603-740-2818. For Frisbee Memorial the number is: 603-335-8490.

Although it’s only five minutes, it’s five minutes that could save the life of you or a loved one. Schedule your appointment today (contact us).

Apr 25 // 2016

The month of May is just around the corner, which as you may know, is now officially “Melanoma Awareness Month” in the state of New Hampshire. As one of the ways in which we will be honoring this proclamation, we have teamed up with two local area hospitals to provide skin cancer screenings completely free of charge.

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