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Dermatology & Skin Health Head Back to Cape Cod to Participate in Challenge Walk MS


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News & Press

Practice MD James Campbell, and PA-C Michelle Roy head to Cape Cod as Part of team Minion Milers to help raise funds and awareness for Multiple Sclerosis research.

Dermatology & Skin Health will be well represented when they send two of their own down to Cape Cod from September 11-13 to participate in the Challenge Walk MS event. The overall goal of the event is to raise $1,000,000 for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Practice MD James Campbell and PA-C Michelle Roy are part of team Minion Milers who are hoping to raise $20,000 in support of the initiative.

Challenge Walk MS is a 50-mile trek, which takes place over the span of the three days. As an added a degree of difficulty, Roy will be running the entire course in one day before joining her team for the walk on day two. Both participants have family members suffering from the disease. For Campbell, he’s walking with his sister in mind, while Roy walks in support of her mother.

“Multiple sclerosis is a tough disease on so many levels,” said Roy. “With all of the efforts that I am currently a part of and have been a part of in the past – Make Big Change, Melanoma Foundation of New England, etc. – this is different. This is for my mom.”

About MS

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling, disease of the central nervous system that interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. MS and the challenges of living with its unpredictable symptoms, which range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis, affect millions of people. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS.

For more information and to donate to the team/cause visit: Team Minion Milers or call us here at Dermatology & Skin Health: 603.742.5556

Aug 21 // 2015

Practice MD James Campbell, and PA-C Michelle Roy head to Cape Cod as Part of team Minion Milers to help raise funds and awareness for Multiple Sclerosis research.

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11 things you need to know for your summer skin care


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News & Press

Summertime and the living is easy. Easy, if you take care of your skin correctly, that is. The tips below come to us under the watchful eye of Michelle Roy, PA-C, MHS, of Dermatology and Skin Health. These are ways you can keep yourself and your family’s skin healthy and looking good while the sun shines.

Take a shot

Apply and reapply... your sunscreen. Try a physical block sunscreen that contains micronized zinc oxide, SPF30. When applying think of a shot glass... this is the volume of sunscreen you need to apply to your entire body. Look to reapply after getting wet or every 2 hours. Check your expiration date.

Give us some lip

Don't forget your lips… use a lip balm with zinc. Badger Balm, a N.H.-based company, makes a great one.

The eyes have it

Your eyes are your window to the world... protect them. Many people do not realize that retinal melanomas are on the rise. Wear your sunglasses daily. Look for ones that will block 100 percent of UV light. Some tints are better than others. Look for ones that are bronze, copper or reddish brown in color.

You're burned. Now what?

If you do get burned, a simple solution to ease discomfort is to use a mixture of skim milk and water as a compress to the sunburned area for 10 minutes. Follow with over the counter hydrocortisone cream and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory like Motrin or Advil.

Tone up

Be sure to wash your face twice a day with a gentle cleanser... summer weather and products can increase oiliness to skin. Some people may even want to use a toner one to two times a week to help reduce oiliness. An inexpensive toner is good old-fashioned witch hazel. Wiping down with a cotton ball can be an easy fix for summertime oiliness.

Lotion promotion

Moisturize… Even though summertime mugginess, sports, and sunblock can increase oiliness to your skin, it is still important to moisturize. This is the time of year when a lotion – usually found in a pump bottle, not a cream – usually found in a jar or tube, can help keep your skin barrier intact.

Dress for success

Keep your clothes on... remember that darker clothes with a tight weave are best. If you can see through it, UV rays can get through it.

Caps won’t cut it

Grab a wide brim hat… simple visors and baseball caps do not adequately cover the delicate skin of your ears, back and side of your neck, nose or cheek bones.

Blister in the sun

Keep an eye on the kids...one bad blistering sunburn before the age of 18 can double a child's risk of developing skin cancer later in life.

Watch out for phytophotodermatitis!

Watch what you eat...many people don't realize that lemons, limes, and mangoes are delicious, but the juices can interact with the sun creating a itchy red rash that can look like a burn. It is what we call a phytophotodermatitis.

Be vigilant

Check your medications. Some common blood pressure medications and acne medications can increase your risk of sun sensitivity.
 

Jun 26 // 2015

Summertime and the living is easy. Easy, if you take care of your skin correctly, that is.

Blog


Don't Fry Day: It's about treating your skin properly


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News & Press

First things first.

Don’t Fry Day has nothing against McDonald’s.

Now that we’ve got that straight, why is this Friday (May 22) Don’t Fry Day?

The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention has declared the Friday before Memorial Day to be “Don’t Fry Day” to encourage sun safety awareness. And it all started in November 2008.

According to information from http://www.sunsafetyforkids.org/dontfryday/, the Sun Safety for Kids’ president, Dr. Jeff Ashley, presented a proposal to the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention for a national observance to focus attention on sun protection. Ashley suggested choosing a Friday and calling it "Don't Fry Day." Very clever marketing.

The proposal was accepted by the Council member organizations, which include the American Cancer Society, American Academy of Dermatology, US EPA, and US CDC among some 40 additional medical and cancer advocacy organizations. After the Council agreed to serve as the official sponsor, the observance was set to take place on the Friday prior to Memorial Day each year.

So, what do you do to observe Don’t Fry Day? Dermatology and Skin Health will be open from 7:30 a.m. to noon. At the 784 Central Ave., Dover offices, you can try the new automated sunscreen dispensers, plus they will give you a sunscreen sample to take with you.

What else can you do? You can educate yourself about sunscreen facts and protection.

Don’t Fry Day asks that you follow as many of the following tips as possible:
-Do Not Burn or Tan
-Seek Shade
-Wear Sun-Protective Clothing
-Generously Apply Sunscreen
-Use Extra Caution Near Water, Snow, and Sand
-Get Vitamin D Safely

From http://skincancerprevention.org/programs/dont-fry-day: “skin cancer is on the rise in the United States, and the American Cancer Society estimates that one American dies every hour from skin cancer. This year alone, the American Cancer Society estimates there will be more than 73,870 new cases of malignant melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, and more than two million new cases of basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers in the U.S.”

If you really want to get involved with Don’t Fry Day, why not follow their Twitter feed? That’s right -- everyone has a Twitter account these days-- and they’ve had one since 2009. Log on to www.twitter.com/dontfryday and check out what the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention is sending out into the Twittersphere.

Remember: Skin cancer can be curable if found early and can be prevented. The mantra to remember is “Slip! Slop! Slap!...and Wrap” when you’re outdoors — slip on a shirt, slop on broad spectrum sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher, slap on a wide-brimmed hat, and wrap on sunglasses.

The best way to detect skin cancer early is to examine your skin regularly and recognize changes in moles and skin growths.

If you see something suspicious, or have questions, please contact Dermatology and Skin Health at 603.742.5556 and visit www.http://dermskinhealth.com/

For more information about Don’t Fry Day, visit The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention at http://www.skincancerprevention.org/

May 21 // 2015

First things first.

Don’t Fry Day has nothing against McDonald’s.

Now that we’ve got that straight, why is this Friday (May 22) Don’t Fry Day?

Blog


Melanoma Monday: May the 4th Be With You...


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News & Press

Sorry for the Star Wars pun. May 4th is actually a far more serious endeavor than we let on in the headline there... 

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month across the United States. And though it’s nice that a month has been set aside for such an initiative, we all really aught to be taking a more conscious approach to making sure we’re not suffering from such disease. Early intervention is key, and is the recipe for cure. When found early, skin cancer is a very curable entity.

The American Academy of Dermatology has coined the first Monday of May as Melanoma Monday – a day set aside solely for the awareness and education of the deadliest form of skin cancer. So here we are, quickly approaching May 4th: The first Monday in May. Be sure to set aside some time and give yourself a visual exam. Check out those moles. Make sure nothing curious has developed on your skin that you haven’t noticed before.

Coinciding with Melanoma Monday, Dermatology and Skin Health will be offering skin cancer screenings, free of charge, on May 4 (and May 6th as well) from 6 to 8 p.m. at Frisbee Memorial Hospital in Rochester and Wentworth Douglass Hospital in Dover. Call for your 5-minute appointment. Schedule your appointment today. Give us a call: 603-740-2818.

But really, set aside a few moments of your time at least once a week to make sure you’re giving yourself a good look over in an attempt to make sure your skin is hiding anything of interest in plain view. Scan your skin, save your life. 

Here’s a quick news clip from FOX News about Melanoma Monday:

 

 

General Skin Cancer Facts -

  • More than 3.5 million skin cancers in more than 2 million people are diagnosed in the United States annually.
  • Current estimates are that 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime.
  • By 2015, it is estimated that 1 in 50 Americans will develop melanoma in their lifetime.

  • Melanoma incidence rates have been increasing for at least 30 years.
  • Since 2004, incidence rates of melanoma among whites have been increasing by almost 3% per year in both men and women.
  • Approximately 75 percent of skin cancer deaths are from melanoma. 

  • On average, one American dies from melanoma every hour.
  • The World Health Organization estimates that more than 65,000 people a year worldwide die from melanoma.

Risk Factors

  • The major risk factor for melanoma of the skin is exposure to ultraviolet light.
  • In 2010, new research found that daily sunscreen use cut the incidence of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, in half. 

  • Increasing intermittent sun exposure in childhood and during one’s lifetime is associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and melanoma.

  • Exposure to tanning beds increases the risk of melanoma, especially in women aged 45 years or younger.
  • In females 15-29 years old, the torso/trunk is the most common location for developing melanoma, which may be due to high-risk tanning behaviors. 

  • People with more than 50 moles, atypical moles, light skin, freckles, or a family history of melanoma are at an increased risk of developing melanoma.


We look forward to seeing you on May 4th

May 01 // 2015

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month across the United States. And though it’s nice that a month has been set aside for such an initiative, we all really aught to be taking a more conscious approach to making sure we’re not suffering from such disease. Early intervention is key, and is the recipe for cure. When found early, skin cancer is a very curable entity.

The American Academy of Dermatology has coined the first Monday of May as Melanoma Monday – a day set aside solely for the awareness and education of the deadliest form of skin cancer. So here we are, quickly approaching May 4th: The first Monday in May. Be sure to set aside some time and give yourself a visual exam. Check out those moles. Make sure nothing curious has developed on your skin that you haven’t noticed before.

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May is for melanoma awareness - Dermatology and Skin Health is here to help


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News & Press

May is a very busy month for Dermatology and Skin Health as it works to spread the word about skin health and skin cancer prevention.

Coinciding with Melanoma Awareness Month, Dermatology and Skin Health will be offering skin cancer screenings, free of charge, on May 4 and May 6 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Frisbee Memorial Hospital in Rochester and Wentworth Douglass Hospital in Dover. Call for your 5 minute appointment -  603-740-2818.

If you’ve got questions about melanoma, Dermatology and Skin Health, and the American Academy of Dermatology have answers. Refer to http://dermskinhealth.com/services/melonoma and www.aad.org for more comprehensive information.

Here are some starters:

The least common type of skin cancer, melanoma, is the most deadly. While it's least common over all, it is the MOST common form of cancer among 25 to 29-year-olds. Melanocytes, the cells in the bottom layer of the epidermis, produce melanin, which is responsible for skin pigmentation.

Melanomas often present as dark brown or black spots on the skin and they spread rapidly to internal organs and the lymph system, making them quite dangerous.
One thing is key: early detection of skin cancer is critical. And that’s where skin checks come in.

Visit http://dermskinhealth.com/services/skin-check to see what a skin check entails. And make your appointment now for a free 5 minutes skin check at either Wentworth Douglass Hospital or Frisbee Hospital on May 4 and 6.

Dermatology and Skin Health’s outreach doesn’t stop with its free skin cancer screenings.

The following activities will also take place during the month of May:

-Saturday, May 2, members of Dermatology and Skin Health will visit Dover Honda and Dover Chevrolet during customer appreciation days and conduct a skin health demonstration. There will be a cookout as well.

-Wednesday, May 13, 6 to 7 p.m., Dermatology and Skin Health will present The Dangers of Tanning Beds. This community education event held in conjunction with Wentworth Douglass Hospital of Dover may make you look at tanning beds/booths a little differently. Refreshments and giveaways. The presentation will be held at Dermatology and Skin Services.
To register, call 742-5556 or email info@dermskinhealth.com.

Thursday, May 21, 5 to 7 p.m., Dermatology and Skin Health is excited to welcome Greater Dover Chamber of commerce members to a monthly Business Open House event held at DSH. Bring plenty of business cards and enjoy an evening of networking with friends and colleagues.

Dermatology and Skin Health, is one of the leading dermatologists in New Hampshire. To schedule an appointment call 742-5556. DSH is located at 784 Central Ave., Dover. www.dermskinhealth.com.

Apr 24 // 2015

Coinciding with Melanoma Awareness Month, Dermatology and Skin Health will be offering skin cancer screenings, free of charge, on May 4 and May 6 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Frisbee Memorial Hospital in Rochester and Wentworth Douglass Hospital in Dover. Call for your 5 minute appointment -  603-740-2818.

Blog


Employee Spotlight: Frances Furbish


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News & Press

Frances Furbish is not only a good witch (see her photo for proof) and a team player (see her other photo for proof), but she’s the billing manager/bookkeeper for Dermatology & Skin Health. The Eliot, Maine resident started working as a contractor for DSH in September 2004 and in January 2010, she joined the DSH staff full-time.

If you attended the recent Martinis for Melanoma benefit for the nonprofit Make Big Change, Frances was the woman in the dress who hopped on the bicycle that was up for auction, and rode it about in front of the stage. That’s fun, and that’s Frances.

Here, she answers a few of our hard-hitting questions:

What makes you want to head to work every day? No day is the same. I like variety. I have lots of piles and projects and my inbox is full. That’s what I call “job security.” Plus, my co-workers are good to work with.

What is one thing that the public doesn’t know about Dr. Campbell that you are allowed to tell us? Dr. Campbell treats his employees like his own family.

Where do you go in Dover for lunch or dinner? I will get a salad from Hannafords most of the time. My family and I enjoy River Bend Pizza & Subs -- simple things.

What do you do on a day off? I am a workaholic. I still have a small side business for my bookkeeping so I am usually catching up on that work - but in the summer I love going to our camp. In winter I work around our house projects like painting rooms.

Do you ever go to the Medi-Spa? I am a very frequent client of the SPA! I have my hair and nails done there, IPL, Pelleve and I use their makeup. Love it !!

What’s the craziest color or design you’ve had on your nails? I am not that crazy when it comes to that so I let Nicole, the nail technician, decide for me. I have had orange, pink, purple, waterfalls, shamrocks and polkadots.

If you were locked in the employee break room, who would I call to get me out? Hmmmm. I guess that would be Laurie Seavey, my partner in crime, (unless she was locked in there with me.) If I locked myself in there stupidly I would not want anyone to know and she would be the one who would not tell.

Please finish this sentence: “When I think of the people I work with at Dermatology & Skin Health, I think of my work family.”

What are you proudest of about Dermatology & Skin Health? I am proud to say that we are a great group of people who care about Dermatology & Skin Health. We like to work hard, work together and play together!  We like to have fun but we get our work done and our patients are #1.

Apr 17 // 2015

Frances Furbish is not only a good witch (see her photo for proof) and a team player (see her other photo for proof), but she’s the billing manager/bookkeeper for Dermatology & Skin Health. The Eliot, Maine resident started working as a contractor for DSH in September 2004 and in January 2010, she joined the DSH staff full-time.

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Spring is Here (Almost) - Protect Your Skin and Join Us at Martinis for Melanoma


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News & Press

There are two things you need to know. The first thing is this: Spring is coming. It’s time to get back outside on the trails and enjoying the idea of ridding yourself of that irritating cabin fever. In anticipation of brighter, warmer days, we want to make sure you’re protecting your skin – because let’s face it, without skin, what would life be like? It’s not something you really want to find out.

Truth be told, New Hampshire currently sits 61% higher than the national average of new skin cancer diagnoses. That’s not a good statistic to be associated with. We need to turn this around. Therefore, it’s indeed imperative that you take skin care seriously as you exercise outdoors. Here are four tips that’ll keep you covered.

  1. Wear Sunscreen

This simple action can save your skin, and potentially your life. Use a water-resistant sunscreen with 30 SPF or above, and remember to re-apply every couple hours, especially during intense activity.

  1. Remember the Less Obvious Body Parts

Don’t forget those ears, shoulders, neck, lips, and the top of the head -regardless of your hair, the sun finds its way through any small window.

  1. Wear Sun Protective Clothing

In short: Wear a shirt. Lighter colored fabrics may feel cooler on the skin, but darker fabrics actually work better to shield and deflect UV radiation. For the head and neck, consider a sun hat or bandana. And don’t forget sunglasses. Your eyes are important too.

  1. Consider Spending Time Outdoors During Off-Peak Hours

Though lunchtime is sometimes one of our only free hours of the day, it’s also when UV rays are strongest. Avoiding the 10am-4pm timeframe is strongly recommended. Set that alarm a little earlier and get your morning run in before work, or wait until after you’ve digested your dinner…

Okay, on to the second thing you need to know…

We’re so excited about our upcoming Martinis for Melanoma event. It’s the second annual. Last year we sold out in advance and the night was an absolute blast.

This year we’re raising funds to benefit the newly launched non-profit, Make Big Change. Are unfamiliar with Make Big Change?

The impetus behind forming Make Big Change was the recognition that we must act now. Without adequate support, education, and prevention initiatives, the destruction caused by this deadly disease will continue to skyrocket. Make Big Change was formed as an action-oriented organization wholly dedicated to fostering progressive steps towards reducing the incidence of skin cancers across the state of New Hampshire. Unite. Act. Make Big Change.

So please, join us. Help us make big change, and let’s once again enjoy a great evening supporting a great cause.

For tickets, CLICK HERE.

You can also call Laurie Seavey directly to reserve your spot: 603.742.5556

Tickets are $60/each or $100/pair.

Mar 23 // 2015

There are two things you need to know. The first thing is this: Spring is coming. It’s time to get back outside on the trails and enjoying the idea of ridding yourself of that irritating cabin fever. In anticipation of brighter, warmer days, we want to make sure you’re protecting your skin – because let’s face it, without skin, what would life be like? It’s not something you really want to find out.

We’re so excited about our upcoming Martinis for Melanoma event. It’s the second annual. Last year we sold out in advance and the night was an absolute blast.

This year we’re raising funds to benefit the newly launched non-profit, Make Big Change. Are unfamiliar with Make Big Change?

So please, join us. Help us make big change, and let’s once again enjoy a great evening supporting a great cause.

For tickets, CLICK HERE.

Blog


Learning from the pros


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News & Press

If you've see a new face in the offices of Dermatology and Skin Health, it's Abby Niziol. She's been soaking up knowledge from Niki Bryn, Dermatology Certified Nurse Practitioner. We're happy to have her (and glad to hear she's a fan of the Garrison City). Read on to discover a little more about the Boston College student.

QUESTION: What's the short story of what you are doing at DSH?

ABBY: I am here at DSH completing clinical hours towards my Family Nurse Practitioner degree. I am being precepted by Niki Bryn, DCNP. As a student, this site offers me opportunities to perform thorough skin evaluations, identify and differentiate between benign and suspicious skin lesions, identify and manage acute and chronic skin conditions, as well as educate patients on proper care of their skin, including sun exposure education. 

QUESTION: How long have you been here, and how long until you're through?

ABBY: I have been here at DSH since January, and will be here until the end of April. As nurse practitioner students, our clinical rotations are typically a semester (or two) long. Official graduation is May 18 (...yes, I have a countdown!) 

QUESTION:  At this point, what do you want to do with your life, professionally?

ABBY: At this point, I am still unsure of what I'd like to accomplish in my professional career. I know I would like to specialize, and I love working with patients across the lifespan. Factors that are going to influence my first job decision will include things like how "new-graduate-friendly" the facilities are, what patient populations I will be working with, and location. I think being an active member of professional nurse practitioner organizations is imperative for maintaining an up-to-date standard of care in practice. Whatever I decide to do professionally, I will be a member of associated professional organizations. 

QUESTION: What school do you attend, and how does Boston compare to Dover?

ABBY: I attend Boston College. Boston is great, but I decided to move up to New Hampshire and commute to school. I'd take Dover over Boston any day! Fresher air, less traffic, more space...what's not to love? 

QUESTION:  What's the coolest thing you've discovered during your time at DSH?

ABBY: The coolest thing I've discovered during my time at DSH is that sunscreen is the simplest yet most effective way to preserve healthy, young, youthful-looking skin. Of course, I always knew the benefits of using sunscreen, but actually seeing the damage that the sun can do over the course of many years is astounding, and puts everything is perspective. If everyone had the opportunity to work in dermatology, even for one day, I think sunscreen would be much more appreciated and utilized. As my preceptor says, "Pale is the new tan!" 

Mar 04 // 2015

If you've see a new face in the offices of Dermatology and Skin Health, it's Abby Niziol. She's been soaking up knowledge from Niki Bryn, Dermatology Certified Nurse Practitioner. We're happy to have her (and glad to hear she's a fan of the Garrison City). Read on to discover a little more about the Boston College student.

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Tips for Healthy, Protected Winter Skin


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With another major winter storm on the radar, it is almost certain that this month will hit the record books as the snowiest in New England history. As thousands head outside this holiday weekend to ski, sled, snowmobile, or simply just shovel out, we at Dermatology would like to take a few moments to send a friendly reminder about the importance of winter UV protection.

We all know not to head out into the cold without a hat and mittens, but what about sunscreen and UV lip balm?

Dr. Perry Robbins, president of The Skin Cancer Foundation tells us, “It’s easy to associate winter with frostbite and windburn, but most people are unaware the UV rays can be every bit as damaging on the slopes as on the beach."

Fact is, winter sunburns can be worse than burns incurred in the summer time, and often times more difficult to detect due to the cold air cooling and numbing affected skin.

One of the reasons for this is that snow is highly reflective. According to the U.S. Skin Cancer Foundation, snow reflects about 80% of UV rays. What this means is that when outside in snow conditions, you are actually hit by the sun twice: once from direct sunlight above, and then secondly from the reflection bouncing off of the snow below you.

Additionally, for many outdoor sports that are enjoyed in mountainous areas, such as skiing and snowshoeing, higher elevation equates to higher risk of sun-induced skin damage. For every 1,000 feet above sea level, UV radiation increases by 5 %. At any one of New Hampshire’s 4,000 ft. mountains, that means a 20% increase in UV exposure.

Lastly, blowing snow, wind, and perspiration can wear away sunscreen and reduce its ability to protect the skin. This is especially important when engaging in activities such as snow blowing, skiing, and hiking in windy areas, where the face is being hit with a lot of snow.

To stay safe this winter, follow these important sun protection guidelines:

  • Make sure to use plenty of high-quality sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. A good rule of thumb is one teaspoon for the face.
  • Don't forget your lips! Use a lip balm with an SPF of 15 or higher.
  • Be sure to cover the spots that often get missed, such as the ears, around the eyes, neck, and underside of the chin - remember to account for sun reflection!
  • When outside for extended periods of time, remember to reapply sunscreen every two hours. During periods of heavy perspiration or blowing snow, reapply even sooner.
  • Wear sunglasses or goggles that will protect your eyes from glare off of snow. Look for brands that offer full UVA/UVB protection.
  • If possible, perform activities earlier or later in the day. The peak period of UV rays is from 10 A.M. to 2 P.M.
  • Use moisturizing soaps and lotions. Winter conditions are tough on skin, and dried, cracked skin is even more susceptible to damage.
  • Drinks lots of water to keep skin fully hydrated.

With these helpful tips in mind, we hope you have a blast out there. Have fun, and be safe!

Feb 13 // 2015

With another major winter storm on the radar, it is almost certain that this month will hit the record books as the snowiest in New England history. As thousands head outside this holiday weekend to ski, sled, snowmobile, or simply just shovel out, we at Dermatology would like to take a few moments to send a friendly reminder about the importance of winter UV protection.

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Employee Spotlight: Justin Mayrand


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Not everyone who works at Dermatology and Skin Health lives and breathes healthcare. In fact, one man who has been working with the practice even before (gasp!) its inception is technology-wizard Justin Mayrand. We're pretty sure he breathes electrons and computer bytes. Here's a fun look at the man himself.

Name: Justin Mayrand
Job title: Owner, Mayrand Computer Services
Age: 45 - but can we lie and say 37 :-)

How many years have you worked with Dermatology & Skin Health?:  I’ve been working at DSH since its inception. Actually, I’ve been working with Dr. Campbell before then, at a software company (now defunct) in Dover. IIRC about 1998 or ’99.

Last job before DSH?: I was working for an Apple dealer that helped Dr. Campbell with his computers, though I’ve done many things in past “lives” such as a tractor mechanic, auto mechanic, genetics researcher, and others.

Best part of your job?: It is always something new, always a new challenge. I also am fortunate to be in a position to only work with people I really want to work with. That makes it fun - I look forward to swinging by Dermatology, knowing it will be a good time and not just another job.

Hardest part of your job?: There are just not enough hours in a day. I want to help everyone to the best of my ability, but don't always have the time I really need to do it.

Where do you eat lunch?: Sadly, it is usually in my car while I return phone calls and messages. If I get a chance to relax, I like more out of the way places like Dos Amigos, country stores and the like.

What's your favorite restaurant to have dinner in Dover?: I don't have one anymore - all of my favorites have closed down. I’ll have to explore for a new one!

Favorite coffee shop?: I don't drink coffee. How weird is that?

What was the earliest home computer you owned?: Ah, an Apple IIe when I was younger. The first I owned was a PowerBook 140. I loved that thing, actually, I still have it. 4MB RAM, 40MB HDD, 14.4K modem - what power!

Feb 03 // 2015

Not everyone who works at Dermatology and Skin Health lives and breathes healthcare. In fact, one man who has been working with the practice even before (gasp!) its inception is technology-wizard Justin Mayrand.

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