Newsletter Signup

[X]

NEWS AND SKIN TIPS


Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".

Blog


Dermatology & Skin Health Joins the Fight to Ban Underage Tanning


Blog
News & Press

Dermatology and Skin Health feels very strongly in protecting people from ultraviolet radiation -- be those rays from the sun, or from tanning beds. As well they should. After all located in Dover, N.H., Dermatology and Skin Health provides care and treatment for conditions of the skin, hair and nails for patients of all ages.

Eleven states now prohibit indoor tanning for minors younger than age 18 (see stats below).

On Jan. 22, Laurie Seavey, practice manager for Dermatology and Skin Health, went to the N.H. Statehouse in Concord, N.H., to testify at the public hearing for  House Bill 0136. HB 0136 makes it unlawful for a person under age 18 to use a tanning device at a registered tanning facility in this state.

Seavey says, "This was my first time speaking on behalf of a House Bill. This topic was so important to us, and we are very passionate about it. As DSH knows and spreads the word, pale is the new tan, but it’s not easy to get that point across, especially to minors in search of that ‘healthy’ glow.

As it now stands, New Hampshire (along with Delaware and North Dakota) “ban the use of indoor tanning by anyone under age 14 unless medically necessary—subsequently requiring parental accompaniment and parental consent for those between 14 and 18 years of age. At least 23 states require operators to limit exposure time to manufacturers’ recommendations and provide eye protection. Along with requiring parental permission for minors, Arizona also requires public schools to provide education about risks to developing skin cancer.” (National Conference of State Legislatures site - http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/indoor-tanning-restrictions.aspx )

The following skin cancer facts, which pertain to indoor tanning salons, and help support the approval of HB 0136, are from The Skin Cancer Foundation:

  • As of Sept. 2, 2014, ultraviolet (UV) tanning devices were reclassified by the FDA from class I (low to moderate risk) to class II (moderate to high risk) devices.
  • An estimated 1,957 indoor tanners landed in US emergency rooms in 2012 after burning their skin or eyes, fainting or suffering other injuries.
  • Eleven states now prohibit indoor tanning for minors younger than age 18: California, Vermont, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, Illinois, Washington, Minnesota, Louisiana, Hawaii, and Delaware.
  • 13 percent of high school students have indoor-tanned in the past year, including over 27 percent of 12th grade females and almost 31 percent of non-Hispanic white females.
  • People who first use a tanning bed before age 35 increase their risk for melanoma by 75 percent.
  • Nearly 30 million people tan indoors in the U.S. every year. Two to three million of them are teens.
  • The indoor tanning industry has annual estimated revenue of $5 billion.
  • People who use tanning beds are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma.
  • Seventy-one percent of tanning salon patrons are females.
  • On an average day, more than one million Americans use tanning salons.

As of the time this blog went live, HB 0136 was in committee. Dermatology and Skin Health is confident that it will be passed, and movement furthering prevention of the damage ultraviolet rays can cause will progress.

As the premier dermatology practice in the Seacoast area, Dermatology and Skin Health pride itself on the comprehensive medical, cosmetic and surgical services it offers patients of all ages its state of the art facility conveniently located on Central Avenue in Dover, NH across from Wentworth - Douglass Hospital.

Feb 03 // 2015

Dermatology and Skin Health feels very strongly in protecting people from ultraviolet radiation -- be those rays from the sun, or from tanning beds. As well they should. After all located in Dover, N.H., Dermatology and Skin Health provides care and treatment for conditions of the skin, hair and nails for patients of all ages.

Blog


Cracks, fissures, eczema and your hands


Blog
News & Press

If you have hand eczema (or hand dermatitis), then you know that one of the more painful things you can experience -- especially during wintertime -- is cracks or fissures on top of it all.

They say the best way to prevent cracked and painful dry hands is to prevent the eczema they formed on top of.

But just how do you do that?

Well, first order of practice to catch the eczema early, and the next is to seal up the cracks.

If your skin is cracking on only your hands and finger joints, it could be caused by contact allergies (from too little moisturizer or too frequent hand washing). If there is continued cracking, fissures, bleeding and no improvement this may be a more serious skin condition.

The National Eczema Association says 10 percent of the population has hand eczema, and that the main symptoms include one or more of the following:

  • Redness (erythema)
  • Itching
  • Pain
  • Dryness, to the point of peeling and flaking
  • Cracks (fissures)
  • Blisters (vesicles)

If you've ever had a crack, you know it can hurt, so be gentle on yourself and seal them up with liquid bandage or ointment such as Vaseline or Aquaphor Healing Ointment. You may need to apply frequently.

The National Eczema Association also says, hand eczema is an inflammatory condition and while not contagious, it can still have a major effect on people's work, social lives and self-esteem. 

Another must: wear gloves.
If you use your hands for work or chores, wear gloves to cut back on irritation of the cracks by adding a protective layer. The gloves can go on right over the protective ointment. And luckily, winter time is a natural time to wear gloves (and there are plenty of styles to choose from!)

What if it's getting worse?
If you notice a sign of infection, you may need an antibiotic ointment, or an oral antibiotic. This is when you need to call your dermatologist.

To make an appointment for your own visit to Dermatology and Skin Health, call 742-5556. We're ready to help you. As the premier dermatology practice in the seacoast area, we pride ourselves in the comprehensive medical, cosmetic and surgical services that we offer patients of all ages in our state of the art facility conveniently located on Central Ave in Dover, NH across from Wentworth - Douglass Hospital.

* Eczema is the term for a group of medical conditions that cause the skin to become inflamed or irritated. The most common types are atopic dermatitis, or atopic eczema.

Dec 10 // 2014

If you have hand eczema (or hand dermatitis), then you know that one of the more painful things you can experience -- especially during wintertime -- is cracks or fissures on top of it all.

They say the best way to prevent cracked and painful dry hands is to prevent the eczema they formed on top of.

Blog


Book Now for your Holiday Present


Blog

There is no particular season for taking care of your body -- it's all the time, right? Well, we've just had our first major storm and are transitioning into the cold winter, which makes it an extra special time to treat your body kindly. Dermatology and Skin Health has some suggestions for you!

IPL PhotoFacial: Using the advanced IPL (intense pulsed light) system, precise amounts of light energy are delivered through your skin’s surface using a special hand piece at the targeted area. The light energy is absorbed by the damaged tissue resulting in a stimulation of the production of collagen. Through this stimulation of collagen the appearance of aging skin is softened. Fine lines and wrinkles are also improved, along with fading of dark pigmentation and age spots, and tighten your pores.

Facials: Especially those that feature exfoliation and add hydration. Start now on a good at home skin regimen too, this can help you to have healthy, glowing skin for the holidays!

Featuring the Aemotio spa water therapy bed: What better way to reward yourself after all that leaf raking, back aching and fall baking than indulging in this treatment? 
Enjoy one of our customized spa body treatments in our state-of-the-art Aemotio spa water therapy bed. With chakra aligned vichy shower, Bolero water massage, and tranquil chromotherapy lighting, this Italian designed bed was the first of its kind in the United States.

Therapeutic water and light stream together immerse the senses, drowning daily chaos with moments of unforgettable relaxation, and intense pleasure; an exclusive esthetic experience shared by both the body and the mind.

If you would like to add on a 30 minute full body massage with one of our therapists, please let us know while you are booking your appointment.

Dec 02 // 2014

There is no particular season for taking care of your body -- it's all the time, right?

Blog


Introducing Our Body of Work


Blog

Visitors to the Dermatology and Skin Health website will notice a fresh facelift under way. Not totally complete yet, the Our Body of Work section has already made an impression.

DSH, working with Boldwerks, a Portsmouth, N.H. based marketing company, decided what better way to showcase the company than through stories from actual patients and clients?

The next step would be how to choose which clients to feature. That opportunity came to Laurie Seavey. As practice manager, Laurie knew firsthand which people had come through the doors at 784 Central Ave. in Dover. The folks she chose were a variety of ages and diagnoses, all with a unique story to tell. In addition, Laurie says, “We picked patients that expressed how wonderful an experience they had at our practice, and felt truly grateful for their experience with us.”

How best to tell these stories (in addition to interviews conducted by Boldwerks)? Photographs -- of course -- were key to the puzzle. Lou Goodman, from Lou Goodman Photography in Wayland, Mass., came to Dermatology and Skin Health for a very intense photo session with real patients/clients Bruce Bacon, Elaine Riley, Missy Payne and daughter Kyla and Janice Martin. Lou said, “The entire shoot took one day...but it was a very intensive, high energy day.”

What did it mean to the veteran photographer to be able to work with actual clients rather than models for this shoot?

“I always prefer to work with real people. Making a connection with real patients/clients is just a more spontaneous, organic process. It takes an amazingly talented actor to transmit a believable emotion. Something the actual client/patient already has... I think there's more substance and usually more fun working with the actual clients and patients. Models look good...but it's a rare one that can communicate authenticity.”

In addition, Laurie Seavey was hands on: “WOW It was a blast. The energy that Lou Goodman brought was spectacular, and he captured the photos of our models personality to perfection,” she said.

Kicking things off on the DSH web page is Bruce Bacon. He’s a cancer survivor (and a man who knows how to wear a hat -- as you’ll see from the images). Bruce isn’t shy about sharing his experience at DSH. “To me, the surgery seemed like it was just a minor thing; a quick incision. But I know it’s deeper than that. I just thought their care was of the highest quality. You might expect the strides they take to make you feel comfortable if you’re about to experience open-heart surgery… The folks at Dermatology and Skin Health treat all their procedures like that. I just thought it was above and beyond… Just a super job.”

Next up is Elaine Riley. Her melanoma was stage three when she was examined by Dr. James Campbell -- a stage that demanded immediate and aggressive attention. Elaine says, “I’ve seen a lot of doctors. I feel like I’ve finally found a home with Dermatology and Skin Health. The doctors here are understanding and accurate. I can’t say enough good things about the staff. They treat you as an individual and make you feel very comfortable. You’re not just ‘another person’ to them, which I deeply admire, respect and appreciate.”

For Missy Payne the story was about how her daughters were treated for their individual skin issues at DSH -- and it was stellar. “Both of my children -- both girls -- are normally going in to the doctors,” says Missy. “They typically don’t like male physicians because they are little and get nervous. A combination of Dr. Campbell’s demeanor and the receptionist’s wonderful greeting at the front desk immediately put them perfectly at ease during the entire office visit.”

Lastly, Janice Martin told us her experience visiting DSH for facial rejuvenation. She visits the practice for cosmetic purposes -- to reduce age defining properties.

Janice says, “After I leave, I feel rejuvenated. When I leave I know that I am going to be looking younger. Botox takes a few days to show clear results so every day you look a little better. It helps me. I feel fresher, more youthful and, full of optimism. It’s a wonderful experience and Dr. Campbell is wonderful at what he does and how he administers it He is a talented doctor. He knows just what to do. I’m thankful for him.”

When asked which part of the “Our Body of Work” project she enjoyed most, Practice Manager Laurie Seavey couldn’t choose just one. “I loved having a hand in the shooting of the subjects. Hearing their individual stories about our practice, learning more about them as we got them comfortable in front of the camera and there personalities came shining through.”

We will be adding more stories to these pages over time. Visit the page at http://dermskinhealth.com/content/our-body-work.

To make an appointment for your own visit to Dermatology and Skin Health to begin your own story, call 742-5556

 
Sep 26 // 2014

Visitors to the Dermatology and Skin Health website will notice a fresh facelift under way.

Blog


Congratulations to Michelle Roy on her appointment to the MFNE Board!


Blog
News & Press

Dermatology and Skin Health is pleased to announce the addition of our own Michelle M. Roy to The Melanoma Foundation of New England’s Board of Directors. Roy is our board certified physician assistant.

We see Roy day after day, and the care she gives to her patients and to causes outside of work as well (including her recently completed Boston Marathon to raise melanoma awareness). She has now added another outstanding responsibility to her plate. We are very proud of her.

The executive director of the MFNE, Deb Girard says, Roy is a passionate advocate for early detection and prevention programs to educate the public about the dangers of skin cancer and melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. She goes on to say, “Michelle's extensive experience and personal dedication make her an ideal fit for a leadership role such as this.”

In addition, Girard says, “Michelle Roy and Dermatology and Skin Health are strong supporters of the mission of the Melanoma Foundation New England to reduce the risk of melanoma in our communities and support those struggling with the disease. Michelle brings to our board passion in fundraising to support our mission and a strong commitment to expand our programs in New Hampshire. As we look for leaders, Michelle meets all of our criteria.”

Here’s more about MIchelle:

Roy is a board certified physician assistant with nearly 20 years of clinical experience. She currently practices at Dermatology & Skin Health in Dover. Her day- to-day practice is focused on the detection and treatment of skin cancers, but her true passion lies in the prevention of the most deadliest form of skin cancer, melanoma. Through the development of innovative educational programs and events, Michelle is focused on increasing awareness and promoting early detection.. keys to saving lives.

She received her physician assistant degree from Duke University Physician Assistant program in 1994. Roy also received the prestigious Richard Scheele Award for academic achievement and leadership in the community. She lives with her husband in the seacoast area of New Hampshire. She is a sponsored endurance athlete enjoys running (we knew that!), cycling, and open water swimming.

As one of the newest members of the board, Roy is looking forward to representing and promoting relationships that advance sun safety in the endurance community for athletes young and old.

“As a high school student, I had a teacher… Ms. Bradbury. She always recognized a good teaching opportunity,” said Roy. “She was young, maybe 26 when she had her melanoma. Towards the end of one day, she told us her story. Her scar was huge. Not sure if it was the scar or her story of vulnerability at almost losing her life at such a young age, but it stuck.”

Here’s more about The Melanoma Foundation of New England:

The Melanoma Foundation of New England (MFNE) was founded in 1999 by Mel and Marilyn Rubin in memory of their son Mark who lost his battle with the melanoma. MFNE’s mission is to reduce the incidence of melanoma in the New England region. We provide a variety of educational programs targeting the prevention and early detection of skin cancer and melanoma for both children and adults. MFNE also assists patients and their caregivers struggling with melanoma by offering support groups, educational programs, and Billy’s Buddies, a one-on-one patient advocacy and support program. These programs are all free. The Melanoma Foundation of New England is a non-profit 501( c )( 3) organization.

For more information about Dermatology and Skin Health, call 742-5556 and visit www.dermskinhealth.com.

 

 

 

 

Sep 18 // 2014

Dermatology and Skin Health is pleased to announce the addition of our own Michelle M. Roy to The Melanoma Foundation of New England’s Board of Directors.

Blog


The Minion Milers' Challenge


Blog

min·ion ˈminyən/ noun a follower or underling of a powerful person, especially a servile or unimportant one.

We beg to differ with you. If you have seen the movie "Despicable Me," you know minions are very important. They made such an impact that Dover dermatologist James Campbell named his fundraising team after them (he had seen the movie "at least a dozen times" after all). And thus, the Million Milers were born to help the fight against multiple sclerosis, a cause close to Dr. Campbell's heart, as his sister has the disease.

The group -- six strong as of press time -- is taking part in the National MS Society, Greater New England Chapter's 50 mile Walk MS: Cape Cod Challenge, which takes place Sept. 5-7. Their goal of $20,000 was within striking distance by press time, through individual fundraising as well as through fundraising done at Botox clinics at the Dover office.

Practice manager Laurie Seavey described the atmosphere at the Aug. 27 fundraising event, which brought the total to $19,026, as "Very exciting. People come in every three to six months to repeat their Botox, so they were at the initial fundraiser as well. They're helping to get team geared up for their event. And the Minion Milers want to be in the top 5!"

Also, these Minions definitely aren't 'unimportant.' To show just how serious they are about helping fight MS, Dr. Campbell has issued the following challenge: To everyone who donates after the team reaches its $20,000 goal, he will match that, up until Sept. 4. For instance, when the team reaches $20,000, if you donate $100 to the Minion Milers team, Campbell will also donate $100.

The challenge walk of 50 miles takes place Sept. 5 to Sept. 7. By participating, teams help to support programs, services, and research sponsored by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

The Minion Milers are Samantha Wibel, Dr. James Campbell Jr., Kimberly McGillicuddy, Jackie Sells, Sunny Wencek and Katie Barrett.

To donate, visit http://dermskinhealth.com/walk-ms-cape-cod-challenge-walk-2014.

For more information, or to make an appointment with Dermatology and Skin Health, call 742-5556. The facility is located at 784 Central Ave., Dover and on the web at www.dermskinhealth.com.

Aug 28 // 2014

min·ion ˈminyən/ noun a follower or underling of a powerful person, especially a servile or unimportant one.

Blog


'Ultraviolet' film shows how the sun sees you -- and it's not pretty


Blog

Sunshine on your shoulders may make you happy, but just look what sunshine on your face does.

N.Y. artist Thomas Leveritt asked people to apply sunscreen to their faces and look at themselves under an ultraviolet light.

And then he made a film about it.

And the film went viral -- 11,673,565 views as of press time.

If you haven’t seen it, here’s the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9BqrSAHbTc

While headlines across the internet read: “The Best Argument EVER in Support of Sunscreen”; “SEE it: Brooklyn filmmaker reveals the importance of using suntan lotion” {wrong}; “Freak Video Shows What Sun Damage is Doing to Your Skin”; and, our favorite, “This Video Showing your Gnarly, Unseen Sun Damage isn’t a Sunscreen Ad but Should be.”

We asked Niki Bryn, APRN, DCNP, from Dermatology and Skin Health to watch the 3 minute 7 second viral video, and give us her thoughts.

What she saw left her astonished. (Well, not really, but if you spend time on the internet, you get the reference!)

Bryn says, “When first viewing this video it strikes me as quite powerful but as a nurse practitioner in dermatology, I am biased toward this message. I have forwarded it to some of my patients who still like to get a tan and seem to be getting the message through viewing the video.

“Unfortunately, many people still believe cancer is never going to happen to them. This video portrays the adverse aging effects of the sun on skin.”

Bryn adds, “I am more concerned about skin cancers, but if this video gets people to comply with sun precautions because of premature aging of the skin, I’ll use it to get the outcome I want for my patients. I preach ‘pale is the new tan’ daily, {and good to note, Bryn is pale herself}, but many who grew up with the idea of a healthy glow are not hearing that message. This may help with that because there is an emphasis on looking younger than our years.”

Again, whether your mantra is Pale is the New Tan or Protect the Skin You’re In, wear sunscreen and if you have any concerns about the condition of your skin, call us at Dermatology and Skin Health, 742-5556.

We are here to help you!

 

 

Aug 22 // 2014

Sunshine on your shoulders may make you happy, but just look what sunshine on your face does.

Blog


We love working with businesses in our community!


Blog

Dermatology and Skin Health does great work at 784 Central Ave., and when we leave our site we also really shine. And when we leave our site and team up with partners within our community, we hit it out of the park.

A community partner is a business or company from the community who DSH works with to become something bigger than ourselves -- and vice versa.

We’ve worked with everyone from Cartelli’s (they know food!) to the Woodman Museum (have YOU seen the polar bear? Have you bought tickets to Night at the Museum yet?!) to great folks in-between, including, but not limited to: Berwick Academy, Dover AutoWorld, Dover Children’s Home, Eastern Propane & Oil, Federal Savings Bank, Flynn Associations, Great Bay Promotions, Greater Dover Chamber of Commerce and Patty B’s.

Most recently, DSH took their knowledge down the road a bit to work with the kids’ summer camps at The Works Health Club in Somersworth. Showing kids (and adults) to avoid the sun, not the fun, was a great way to spend a Friday.

If your company is interested in partnering with Dermatology & Skin Health, please contact Practice Manager Laurie Seavey at Call (603) 742-5556 or email l.seavey@dermskinhealth.com. We’d love to hear from you!

Jul 30 // 2014

A community partner is a business or company from the community who Dermatology and Skin Health works with to become something bigger than ourselves -- and vice versa.

Blog


Get ready for Night at the Museum II Aug. 22-24


Blog
Upcoming Event

A fantastic fundraiser is a marquee event. That’s why Night at the Woodman Museum is back to enlighten and entertain the Garrison City from Aug. 22 to Aug. 24.

If you were lucky enough to attend last year’s sold-out run, you’ll be in for new treats at this year’s showing, subtitled: Notable Events: The Good, the Bad and the Strange.

The production will include 22 scenes of Dover history that come to life during the hour and a half tour through the grounds of the museum at 182 Central Ave.  Dermatology & Skin Health is happy to be part of this year’s festivities by participating as an underwriter. Dennis Ciotti, a business owner and lifelong resident of the Garrison City, who is also a trustee of the Woodman Museum, is ready to do his part.

While you won’t see Ciotti as one of the 50 some-odd actors, “I’ll probably be a tour guide. You don’t want me acting,” he joked. What does he think of DSH being an underwriter? “I think it’s fantastic. Last year was our first and this is one of our annual fundraisers. That’s what it’s all about. We are a nonprofit that relies on donations and memberships to keep it going.” Ciotti also adds some friendly advice: Get your tickets NOW. “Last year was the first year and it was a sell out. We expect it to sell out again. Pre-promotion and advertising are 2-3 times larger… and through donations with Foster’s and WTSN, I think we’ll sell out even faster.”

Be sure to hit up the Night at the Museum to learn about the early settlers, their strange laws and the punishments that took place. You’ll see an early grist mill come alive and learn about the fire that destroyed another Dover mill. Meet a civil war soldier who fought at Gettysburg and Captain William Flagg whose crew captured a British cannon and supplied a captured bell to one of Dover’s earliest schools. More than 50 people are needed to act and assist in this historical presentation that benefits the museum. It’s fair to say Dermatology & Skin Health Practice Manager Laurie Seavey knows one of the actors pretty well: Her son Ross is portraying actor Ernest Borgnine in a scene from the 1951 movie “The Whistle at Eaton Falls,” which was filmed at the mill downtown. Seavey herself will be a newcomer to the event, “Unfortunately, I was unable to attend last year’s event, but I won’t miss this year. We love partnering with the Woodman Museum. It’s so interesting learning about events that went on in our own back yard years ago.” Seavey adds, “We are happy to underwrite and support such a great place for the entire family.”

Night at the Museum is underwritten by Dermatology and Skin Health and Foster’s Daily Democrat. Tickets are on sale at the museum by calling 742-1038. For information, visit www.woodmanmuseum.org.

Dermatology and Skin Health is the premier dermatology practice in the seacoast area. It prides itself in the comprehensive medical, cosmetic and surgical services it offers patients of all ages in its state of the art facility located on Central Ave in Dover, across from Wentworth-Douglass Hospital.

Bonus:

Laurie Seavey says: “If you haven't been to our office (784 Central Ave., Dover) we have our own little museum right here of over 25 photos. Photos include  President Teddy Roosevelt and Howard Taft's visit to Dover in the early 1900s along with tickets to the City Opera House from 1903 'The Working Girl' and 'Shipwrecked.' And we have multiple maps dating back to 1871."

Dennis Ciotti has a favorite object in the museum, and it’s not the oft-cited 10-foot polar bear either. “It’s Thom Hindle, the museum curator and the oldest artifact and most knowledgeable in the museum.”

 

 

 

Jul 23 // 2014

Night at the Museum is underwritten by Dermatology and Skin Health and Foster’s Daily Democrat. Tickets are on sale at the museum by calling 742-1038. For information, visit www.woodmanmuseum.org.

Blog


Protecting Yourself from the Sun (Well, the UV Rays...)


Blog
News & Press

On Friday, July 25, we’ll be hosting a fun-filled clinic at The Works in Dover from 10 a.m. until noon! (Two one hour sessions).

The topic?

Kids and sunscreen.

Why?

Simple really. One of the most important things you can do in the sunny, summer months is protect your skin. It’s important to teach proper use and application to our youth because their teachers, daycare professionals, camp councilors, etc., are not permitted to apply sunscreen to their skin. Thus, they need to be able to do it themselves, and do it correctly to get the full advantage of “covering up” and protecting themselves from the suns harmful UV rays.

Sunburns are bad. Sure we laugh about it when we see how red we “accidentally” got after spending an afternoon outside with little to no clothes (protection) on. But seriously, sunburns are bad. Think about the genetic makeup of the word sunburn. “Burn.” Do you like burnt food? Do we laugh when a family’s home burns down? No. Burns are not a laughing matter, and in terms of a sunburn, you only need to be burned once to put yourself at risk for the development of something far worse down the road: Melanoma. Not so funny now, is it?

Cover up. We glorify tanned, bronzed skin, but what’s the long term expense?

We’re here to tell you: It’s not good.

The transition of good care in sunny conditions starts in youth. That’s what this engaging presentation will be all about. We’ll laugh, play games, win prizes, and learn about proper application and care tips for the moments when the sun is shining brightest.

What’s the right sunscreen for you? What are other ways to prevent burning? How do I know I’m fully protected? Are my practices effective?

All good questions. We’re ready to tackle them…

Join us! (Please note: This program is for kids enrolled in camp at The Works.)

Jun 11 // 2014

On Friday, July 25, we’ll be hosting a fun-filled clinic at The Works in Dover from 10 a.m. until noon! (Two one hour sessions).

Pages