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Say Hello To Our Community Partners!


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News & Press

We’ve just built out our community partner’s page on our site, and wanted to make everyone aware of the great bonds we’ve formed in the community.

We pride ourselves on doing great work at 784 Central Ave., but it’s when we leave our site that we really shine. And when we leave our site and team up with the following community partners, we hit it out of the park.

Check out the list here.

Want to team up with us?

Call (603) 742-5556 or email info@dermskinhealth.com.

May 26 // 2014

We’ve just built out our community partner’s page on our site, and wanted to make everyone aware of the great bonds we’ve formed in the community.

Blog


New Hampshire scores high on melanoma diagnoses (that's bad and good)


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News & Press

The next time you’re told to cover up before going out in the sun, you’ll want to listen. You might think, because you’re not in California or Florida -- because you’re in New Hampshire -- that you might be safe from the negative effects of the sun. That’s where you’d be wrong.

The following information, taken from the U.S. Office of Air and Radiation.

“Skin cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in the United States. This fact sheet presents statistics about skin cancer for New Hampshire and the United States as a whole.

  • Sunburns. A 2004 survey found that 43.8% of white adults in New Hampshire had at least one sunburn in the past year. Sunburns are a significant risk factor for the development of skin cancer.
  • New Cases of Melanoma. New Hampshire had the second highest rate of new melanoma diagnoses in the U.S. from 2001-2005, 61% higher than the national average.9,10 In 2008, an estimated 400 state residents were diagnosed with melanoma, which is responsible for 75% of all skin cancer deaths.
  • Grafton County has the highest rate of melanoma diagnoses in the state, 160% above the national average.
  • Deaths from Melanoma. More than 40 people in New Hampshire die of melanoma every year. New Hampshire had the 7th highest melanoma death rate nationally from 2001-2005—18.5% higher than the U.S. average.
  • Grafton County (where the Old Man of the Mountain was once located) has the highest melanoma death rate in the state, 63% higher than the national average."

And this isn’t new information. So it’s totally time to take heed.

Schedule a consultation today with Dermatology & Skin Health at 742-5556. Located at 784 Central Ave., Dover, Dermatology and Skin Health prides itself on being a comprehensive dermatology practice, that offers state-of-the-art services in the treatment of skin cancer, dermatology and cosmetic dermatology. In our medi-spa clients choose from an array of safe, non-surgical cosmetic procedures that can improve or eliminate unwanted imperfections, rejuvenate their skin and bring back a youthful glow. For information, visit http://dermskinhealth.com/, and “friend” us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/DermatologySkinHealth.

 

May 20 // 2014

The next time you’re told to cover up before going out in the sun, you’ll want to listen.

Blog


Michelle Roy conquers Boston Marathon


Blog
News & Press
Running

We have been following Michelle Roy, PA-C, MHS for months now as she’s trained for the 118th Boston Marathon on April 21. Well, blog readers, we’re happy to report she finished both her fundraising and foot racing with flying colors. At press time, $27,406 was raised for Team Running for Cover (exceeding the $20,000 goal). The money will benefit the Melanoma Foundation of New England.

Michelle’s time? 3 hours and 37 minutes. Here’s more from the amazing athlete herself.

 

BOLDWERKS: This isn’t your first marathon -- what set this one apart from the others?

MICHELLE ROY: Indeed this was not my first marathon, but this one was like no other. The crowds were amazing. From start to finish, there was not one section of real estate from Hopkinton to Boston that was not covered by a fan screaming your name. It was crazy, loud, inspiring, and most of all really fun.

 

BOLDWERKS: Please tell us how people from DSH helped you on your 2014 Boston Marathon journey.

MICHELLE:  Had support from the entire office... lots of well wishes via text and on Facebook from staff who could not be there. Laurie Seavey, Francis Furbish, Eileen Shatinsky, Sunny and her daughter and of course, Dr. Campbell, all came down to participate in the cheering sectional mile 17 for DSH.

 

BOLDWERKS: What did you draw from to finish the 26.2 miles?

MICHELLE:  It was hard not to draw from the crowds of people shouting your name, especially as we came into Brookline. From Brookline to the finish the crowds were some six rows deep on either side. Also, seeing my husband, Pete, at mile 25 was perfect. So many well known people on the course, passing the Hoyts at mile 16 was also pretty special.

 

BOLDWERKS:  We asked you to submit the favorite photo you took and that was taken of you. Please tell us about them.

MICHELLE: The photos include a pre race photo... as you can see I was super excited... and post race... pretty psyched for my time... it was a BQ time by 8 minutes for my age group.

 

BOLDWERKS: You just helped raise $27,406 for Team Running for Cover. Congratulations! What’s your next step?

MICHELLE: Next up, I race for Acidotic Racing… a local endurance team with deep routes in the New England community. My race season is just beginning...lots of trail races, Xterra events,a few ultras and mountain biking endurance events. I’ll be doing my first 12 hour event this summer. I also have decided to do another marathon in December... the Cayman Island International. I really want to place in top five for women:) I plan to start do specific training for that marathon in September. Look out for me there!

Apr 29 // 2014

We have been following Michelle Roy, PA-C, MHS for months now as she’s trained for the 118th Boston Marathon on April 21. Well, blog readers, we’re happy to report she finished both her fundraising and foot racing with flying colors. At press time, $27,406 was raised for Team Running for Cover (exceeding the $20,000 goal). The money will benefit the Melanoma Foundation of New England.

Blog


Marathon Monday: One week to go for Michelle and Team


Blog
News & Press
Running

The Boston Marathon is merely days away, and we are so proud! Here at Dermatology & Skin Health of Dover, we’re beyond thrilled to announce that at the time this blog hits the screen, $26,293 has been raised for Team Running for Cover, http://dermskinhealth.com/running-for-cover, to help meet (and surpass!) its $20,000 goal to benefit the Melanoma Foundation of New England.

Our engine, the person doing the actual miles on the pavement, is DSH’s own physician’s assistant, Michelle Roy.

Michelle will be part of Team Running for Cover, which will be running the 118th Boston Marathon on Monday, April 21. If you haven’t been keeping track, Roy is an important team member of both DSH and Team Running for Cover and you can catch up with her training and fundraising online at http://www.crowdrise.com/michelleroy.

We caught up with Roy ourselves, in between strides to ask her thoughts the week before the race:

QUESTION: How did you get involved with the Melanoma Foundation of New England and Team Running for Cover?
MICHELLE ROY: I became involved with MFNE to get the message out regarding melanoma. It is a real killer. I spend my days talking with my patients regarding the risks and dangers of it. I really wanted to put more action to my words and also honor those patients who have it and those who have lost their battle.

QUESTION: What are your personal goals for the marathon?
MICHELLE ROY: I want to enjoy the experience. This is the official start of my race season, so I do not want to injury myself. Marathoning is all about pacing oneself. As a master runner (over age 40) , it would be great to finish around 3:40.

QUESTION: Describe what your training regimen has been like leading up to the race. How long have you been preparing for this event?
MICHELLE ROY: My training began in November. I run an average of 60+ mile weeks with some races sprinkled in for good measure to make certain I am meeting my target paces.

QUESTION: How many marathons have you participated in?
MICHELLE ROY: This will be my sixth marathon.

QUESTION: You've raised more than $26,000 to date in support of the cause. How does that make you feel?
MICHELLE ROY:  The money that the office has raised has been amazing. I’m so proud of all of my office co workers and their strong work in fundraising. It has taken a village to make this all work. I’d like to give a special thank you to Laurie Seavey and Dr. Campbell for their unwavering support throughout this process.

QUESTION: What are your top three ultimate marathon soundtrack songs that will be playing in your head as you run the race?
MICHELLE ROY:  Oh, this is tough. I love music and my shuffle is constantly changing. I listen to Scottish bagpipes, yes... I said... Scottish bagpipes… when it is raining on the coast or you find yourself running up steep mountains ... it helps. Otherwise, I have everything from "Happy" to "Testify" by Rage Against the Machine.

QUESTION: What's the last meal you will eat prior to the race?
MICHELLE ROY: Since Boston starts at 11:20 a.m., my last meal will be breakfast. I do steel cut oats cooked in apple juice with blueberries, cinnamon, and brown sugar.  I am sponsored by Osmo and Honey Stinger for the 2014 race season, so that is what I will be sipping and noshing on during the run.

QUESTION: What is your preferred brand of running shoes?
MICHELLE ROY: MIZUNO.

QUESTION:  What does this race mean to you on a personal level?
MICHELLE ROY: Marathons are always very special. The distance is one that you must respect. Boston is unique in that it is mostly downhill, with hills in the middle. I am looking forward to the experience of running this year: so many people, so much meaning, and just plain gratitude for being healthy enough to do it.

QUESTION:  What does this race mean to the notion of raising awareness about Melanoma?
MICHELLE ROY: One of my teammates lost her son at the age of 21 this past December to melanoma. Every day I think of Connor as I speak to my patients about melanoma. Our entire team's running singlets will honor Connor. He was a "ginger." A beautiful young man who lost his life way too early. We are all running Boston to support his mom with her loss, but also to Run for the Ginger! I will have it tattooed on my arm as my mantra for the race (a temporary tattoo, of course).

Apr 14 // 2014

The Boston Marathon is merely days away, and we are so proud!

Blog


Dr. Campbell readies for Orlando conference


Blog
News & Press

Dr. James Campbell will be presenting at the The Dermatology Nurses' Association on May 1-4 in Orlando, Fla.

QUESTION: What topics will you be presenting?
ANSWER: I’m actually doing three lectures on two different topics: Bites and Stings — everything from insects to jellyfish, how to recognize them and how to treat them. The next one is on photosensitivity (medications etc.).

Q: Who is this program meant for and how many have of these have you attended?
A: It’s a national convention for nurse practitioners and nurses in dermatology. This is the fourth time I’ve spoken at this annual meeting. They ask me about every other year.

Q: What are you hoping attendees will take with them?
A: More awareness on what to expect, how to recog and treat, basically it’s designed to enhance their clinical skills.

Q: What is the part of the conference that you are most looking forward to?
A: I always liked the nurse practitioners forum.

Q: What active clinical trials are you conducting?
A: I’m working on a biologic medication for psoriasis and a topical antiinflammatory for acne.

Q: What would you take with you to a desert island?
A: My iPhone, I guess. Assuming I could get a signal.

 

To learn more about this year's Dermatology Nurses' Assocation conference, visit http://www.dnanurse.org/education/annual-convention.

Apr 07 // 2014

Dr. James Campbell will be presenting at the The Dermatology Nurses' Association on May 1-4 in Orlando, Fla.

Blog


Opening Day conversation with Dr. Campbell


Blog
News & Press

April 4 is the Red Sox opening day on their home turf. Dr. Campbell's home turf is his office in Dover. And the pride of this home turf is his display of Red Sox memorabilia. It's worth booking an appointment to just look at the Ortiz bat. We stole some free mements with Dr. Campbell right before opening day:

BOLDWERKS: You have two passions, well, at least two, as evident from your office decor. What are they?
DR. CAMPBELL: Two seasons. Fishing and baseball.

BOLDWERKS:  What is the oldest piece of Red Sox memorabilia?
DR. CAMPBELL: The picture of the 1967 Red Sox team. The Impossible Dream year.

BOLDWERKS:  If there was a fire, what would you grab first? (After clearing all of your patients and staff from the premises…)
DR. CAMPBELL:  I’d probably grab the baseballs.

BOLDWERKS:What do you think the Sox’s chances are this year?
DR. CAMPBELL:  I think they’re good. They’ll definitely be contending and playing in October. When you get to October, anything can happen.

BOLDWERKS:  Who do you like most on the team?
DR. CAMPBELL:  It would have to be Dustin Pedroia. He works incredibly hard and is very passionate about getting better at his craft, and seems to genuinely care the team and his teammates.

BOLDWERKS:  If you were a player, what would your theme song be when you were up to bat?
DR. CAMPBELL:  (Laughs) Probably Springsteen’s “Badlands.”

BOLDWERKS:  What excites you about a new baseball season?
DR. CAMPBELL:  It’s a whole new year, it’s like spring, every year hope springs eternal, especially in Fenway Park. You never know what you’re going to get. You never know how it’s going to go, but you have all the enthusiasm and optimism at the beginning of the year. I think I suffer from what I call Baseball Seasonal Affective Disorder, because they take you to the highest highs and the lowest lows …

BOLDWERKS:  How do patients react to your fish room and your Red Sox room?
DR. CAMPBELL:  It starts conversations and kind of breaks the ice walking in. Everybody has their own relative that’s really into fishing, or they themselves are. They want to know where you go, or what the biggest fish you ever caught was.

BOLDWERKS:  Will you be at opening day on Friday?
DR. CAMPBELL:  Oh, gee, I’ve got to work.

 

 

Apr 04 // 2014

April 4 is the Red Sox opening day on their home turf. Dr. Campbell's home turf is his office in Dover. And the pride of this home turf is his display of Red Sox memorabilia.

Blog


Letter from the last looooooong run


Blog
News & Press
Running

March 31, 2014

Hi guys,

The last long run is in the books. Along with one of my teammates, I ran the Eastern States 20 miler on Sunday (March 30). It was initially looking like an epic day to run with 15mph steady winds, horizontal rains, and chilly temps, but as the race started the rains stopped and the winds turned to the northeast creating a sweet tail wind. Using it as a training run, and less a race, ran a steady 8:25 pace and felt great. Teammate, Jen, was able to hold that pace for 20 miles which was faster than her marathon pace. Great work Jen!

While we ran we chatted about marathon nutrition, gear, and interesting facts about the race.

  • Did you know that women were officially allowed to run in 1972?!
  • Did you know that the highest point on the course is the start at 490 feet above sea level?
  • Did you know that in 1905, temperatures for the race were 100 degrees? In 1967 there were snow squalls!?

The taper begins, which means a slight decrease in volume. No more 70 miles a week of running. We will cut back to 50's :) but will maintain my speed and tempo running. Will also be running those notorious Newton hills in a week with teammates.

Happy running,

Michelle Roy
Physicians Assistant
Team Running for Cover
Team DSH

 

Mar 31 // 2014

The last long run is in the books. Along with one of my teammates, I ran the Eastern States 20 miler on Sunday (March 30). It was initially looking like an epic day to run with 15mph steady winds, horizontal rains, and chilly temps, but as the race started the rains stopped and the winds turned to the northeast creating a sweet tail wind.

Blog


Have you heard of ocular melanoma?


Blog
News & Press
Running

The 118th Boston Marathon is less than a month away – set for April 21, 2014. Dermatology & Skin Health is excited to support their very own Physician Assistant, Michelle Roy, who will be running in this year's event as a member of team Running for Cover, a group of runners representing the Melanoma Foundation of New England (http://mfne.org).

As part of an educational component of her training for the big day, Michelle has been sharing facts with us about melanoma, and here is one some of her friends have never heard of: ocular melanoma.

Michelle says, “During each skin exam, I take the time to discuss with patients the risk of ocular melanoma..
yes, that is right.. melanoma can happen in the eye.
Ocular melanoma accounts for 5 to 12 percent of all melanoma cases.

Michelle refers us to the following link, for the necessary facts:

http://bit.ly/1myrjyc

From the Melanoma Research Foundation:

Ocular melanoma, also known as uveal melanoma or choroidal melanoma, is usually found in the part of the eye called the uvea, which is composed of:

  • The iris - the colored part of the eye that opens and closes to change the amount of light that enters the eye.
  • The ciliary body - a muscle in the eye that changes the shape of the lens so the eye can focus.
  • The choroid - a layer of tissue that is in the back of the eye, next to the retina, that makes a picture. Choroidal melanomas are the most common type of ocular melanoma.

And here are some ocular melanoma facts from the Melanoma Research Foundation:

  • Ocular melanoma is not thought to be related to sun exposure
  • Approximately 2,000 Americans are diagnosed with ocular melanoma each year
  • Eye tumors should be treated by an ophthalmologist who specializes in treating ocular melanoma
  • Ocular melanoma spreads to other organs in the body in abouthalf of all cases
  • When ocular melanoma spreads, it most commonly spreads to the liver

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/1myrjyc

Learn more about Michelle's run to raise awareness about melanoma.
Please go to: www.crowdrise.com/michelleroy

Mar 28 // 2014

The 118th Boston Marathon is less than a month away – set for April 21, 2014. Dermatology & Skin Health is excited to support their very own Physician Assistant, Michelle Roy, who will be running in this year's event as a member of team Running for Cover, a group of runners representing the Melanoma Foundation of New England.

Blog


Obagi Donates to the Cause


Blog
News & Press
Running

As part of Dermatology & Skin Health’s mission to raise money for the Melanoma Foundation of New England – which peaks with Physician Assistant Michelle Roy running in the 118th Annual Boston Marathon – Obagi Medical Products contributed to the cause by donating some of their products in an effort to promote awareness. Boldwerks interviewed Obagi’s Senior Product Manager, Brittany Reynolds, to discuss the company’s own mission in fighting this disease, and the importance in partnering with DSH.

Boldwerks: You recently donated sunscreen samples to DSH for use in their marketing efforts of the Melanoma awareness campaign. Can you give me the details of that donation? 

Brittany Reynolds: We supported DSH with 500 deluxe size samples of the Sun Shield Matte SPF50. Obagi® Sun Shield Matte is our most popular Obagi sunscreen, a broad-spectrum sunscreen which protects against sunburn, and the overall sun health protection.

Boldwerks: Why did you deem it important to play a role in this cause? What excites you about partnering with DSH for this initiative?

BR: It’s important for us to continue to raise awareness with regards to skin health and sun protection.  We are very excited to partner with DSH because it allows us to reach out to active customers and help build awareness.

Boldwerks: Tell us a bit more about your company. What role do you play in the fight to protect the skin from harmful UV rays?

BR: Obagi Medical Products, a division of Valeant Pharmaceuticals, is dedicated and committed to delivering solutions that transform lives by merging clinical efficacy and access to professional grade skin care products.  Obagi Medical Products supports the skin cancer foundation and a number of other foundations.  Also, many of Obagi’s sunscreen products have been granted the skin cancer seal of recommendation (from the Skin Cancer Foundation – www.skincancer.org).  

Boldwerks: Tell us a bit more about the product line you donated. What differentiates it from other products on the market?

BR: Obagi Sun Shield Matte SPF50 combines UVB absorption and UVA protection in an elegant, matte finish that is non-comedogenic, non-acnegenic, and dermatologist tested. It’s an elegant sheer, PABA free, and fragrance free formulation for all skin types.  

Boldwerks: What are some common misconceptions that you try to educate people about in your own marketing efforts? What gets people excited and/or determined to use Obagi as a daily part of their skin care routine? 

BR: The biggest misconception is in darker skin types.  Many of the Fitzpatrick skin types III-VI don’t believe in sun protection because they naturally have more pigment in their skin.  It’s important they continue to protect their skin because they too still get exposed to harmful rays, which eventually cause breakdown among the collagen, and elastin.  

Obagi’s sunscreens are broad spectrum.  This is a must-have with any sunscreen.

All ages. All skin types. There’s an Obagi for everyone. “Obagi for Life” is our commitment to you and a lifetime of beautiful, healthy-looking skin. Our role as a worldwide leader in skin health is based on a belief that regardless of your age or skin type, there truly is an Obagi for everyone.

About Obagi:

Obagi Medical Products, Inc., is a global specialty pharmaceutical company founded by leading skin care experts in 1988, and is now owned by Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. Obagi products are designed to minimize the appearance of premature skin aging, skin damage, hyperpigmentation, acne, and sun damage and are primarily available through dermatologists, plastic surgeons, medical spas, and other skin care professionals.

Mar 25 // 2014

As part of Dermatology & Skin Health’s mission to raise money for the Melanoma Foundation of New England – which peaks with Physician Assistant Michelle Roy running in the 118th Annual Boston Marathon – Obagi Medical Products contributed to the cause by donating some of their products in an effort to promote awareness. Boldwerks interviewed Obagi’s Senior Product Manager, Brittany Reynolds, to discuss the company’s own mission in fighting this disease, and the importance in partnering with DSH.

Blog


Melanoma Fact: Tanning vs. Smoking - Which is Worse?


Blog
News & Press
Running

Did you know that a recent study revealed that the number of skin cancers due to tanning is higher than those cases of lung cancer due to smoking...

http://www.skincancer.org/news/tanning/international

Learn more about Michelle's run to raise awareness about melanoma! Please go to: www.crowdrise.com/michelleroy

Mar 06 // 2014

Did you know that a recent study revealed that the number of skin cancers due to tanning is higher than those cases of lung cancer due to smoking...

http://www.skincancer.org/news/tanning/international

Learn more about Michelle's run to raise awareness about melanoma! Please go to: www.crowdrise.com/michelleroy

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