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World Psoriasis Day. Please Join in giving a Voice to Psoriasis


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This October 29th, celebrete World Psoriasis Day. Living with psoriasis has unique challenges. The good news is health care providers are becoming more aware of the impact psoriasis can have on a person’s quality of life. Researchers are focused more now than ever on finding solutions to those challenges.

Please join in giving a voice to plaque Psoriasis. Many with psoriasis make difficult choices between managing their disease and other priorities. That's why we are handing you the megaphone to tell the world the choices you've had to make to get treatment. Your stories will be shared with Congress to gain support for the Patients' Access to Treatments Act (PATA), a bill aimed at lowering treatment costs.

 Visit the National Psoriasis Foundation at http://www.psoriasis.org

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Oct 28 // 2013

This October 29th, celebrete World Psoriasis Day. Living with psoriasis has unique challenges. The good news is healthcare providers are becoming more aware of the impact psoriasis can have on a person’s quality of life. Researchers are focused more now than ever on finding solutions to those challenges.

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How to care for a biopsy site


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We perform a lot of biopsies in our office.  Often we are asked how to best care for a biopsy site... here are a few simple things you can do.

  1. Keep it covered. DO NOT leave it open to the air to breathe.  Any wound or biopsy will heal quicker if kept moist and covered.
  2. Apply plain Vaseline or Aquaphor to the site.. many people are allergic or sensitive to topical  antibiotic creams.
  3. Keep the site clean with plain soap and water. DO NOT use peroxide, it can irritate the skin.
  4. Keep the wound covered with a simple band-aid.  If you are allergic to latex, use latex free paper tape.

If ever in doubt about how your wound is healing.  Call the office at 603-742-5556 and ask to speak to a nurse.

 

 

 

 

Oct 01 // 2013

We perform a lot of biopsies in our office.  Often we are asked how to best care for a biopsy site... here are a few simple things you can do.

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My pre-teen just started middle school and suddenly has terrible acne. Is the timing coincidence or is this just normal and how can I help?


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Q & A on Pre-teen Acne

Question:  My pre-teen just started middle school and suddenly has terrible acne. Is the timing coincidence or is this just normal and how can I help?

Answer:  You and your pre-teen are not alone.  The start of middle school and acne don’t necessarily have to go hand in hand, but it’s not uncommon.  Acne can be triggered by a number of factors.  Hormones released at the onset of puberty are responsible for the appearance of acne during the teen years. These hormones stimulate the skin’s sebaceous, or oil glands, creating an oily skin that is more prone to pore blockages and breakouts. There have been studies indicating stress and diet could also be triggers.  The stress of starting a new school or maybe new eating habits – like eating lunch in the cafeteria verses bringing lunch to school – are part of the culprit.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, nearly 100% of all teens have at least the occasional breakout. Acne strikes all teenagers equally, regardless of sex, race or ethnicity. Teen acne generally begins between the ages of ten and thirteen. The most common progression starts on the nose, then spreads to the forehead, chin, and cheeks. In more severe cases, acne may affect the neck, shoulders, chest, back and upper arms.

The best way you can help is to see a Dermatologist with your child as quickly as possible.  Over-the-counter treatments may work but you could go several weeks with home treatment and still see no improvement.  More than 40% of teen acne is serious enough to require treatment by a doctor, especially for boys.  Young men are much less likely to see a doctor about their acne, even though they tend to have longer lasting and more severe acne than girls. This may be due to the fact that young women feel more comfortable expressing their feelings regarding their skin and are more comfortable asking for help. Parents need to be aware that their young man may be extremely distressed about his skin, but could be unwilling or unable to voice his discomfort.

While acne is a physical problem, it also affects teens psychologically. Even if the acne is relatively mild, it may have a big impact on self-esteem and self-confidence. The more severe the acne, the greater the emotional toll it takes on the teen. Teenagers with acne tend to have a poor body image. It’s normal for sufferers to feel self-conscious or embarrassed about their skin. Boys in particular might feel uncomfortable undressing in the locker room if acne is present on the body. Teens may be unwilling to participate in sports, such as swimming, because of embarrassment about their skin.

Because of this, teens are prone to jump from product to product, searching for an acne remedy. Teenagers who are very upset about the state of their skin may also use topical medications to excess, in an attempt to speed clearing.  It’s important for teens to understand that all acne medications, including over-the-counter remedies, must be used as directed. Applying too often or in too great of concentration can easily cause excessive dryness, peeling, redness, irritation, and can actually increase healing time.

Parents need to understand that even mild acne may have a profound impact on the way their teen feels about themselves. Helping with treatment and support can go a long way in protecting and repairing a teen’s self-esteem.  It can be so hard to be patient while waiting for the skin to heal, so all teens need to be reminded that treatment takes time. Nearly every case of acne can be successfully controlled, given time and the right treatments.

 
 
Sep 19 // 2013

 

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Considering anti-wrinkle treatments? Ask these important questions first


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Considering anti-wrinkle treatments? Ask these important questions first

July 18, 2013 by

You’ve recently looked in the mirror and decided that you’re finally going to do something to soften your facial wrinkles. That’s great – there’s quite a lot of evidence to show that you feel more confident when you look your best. Who doesn’t want to look their best, right?

Q) So where do you start?

A) With all the right questions. As a dermatologist who also has had anti-wrinkle treatments, I’ve been on both sides of the consultation desk and have asked and answered lots of questions. Here’s an easy guide to the important questions that you will want to answer before going ahead with an anti-wrinkle treatment.

Q) What bothers you the most?

A) Determine the area on your face that needs to be treated to make you look your best. This is important to understand and not always easy to do. It’s important to be clear about this before you see your doctor. Ask a good friend or relative to give you an honest assessment of what area they feel you could improve upon. Alternatively, ask them: What’s my best feature? Determining this lets you know what you don’t need to change.

Once you’ve decided to have an anti-wrinkle treatment, several more questions for your doctor become important. You should write these down beforehand so you won’t forget them when you’re in the doctor’s office. They include:

Q) What anti-wrinkle treatment are they proposing for you? Is it wrinkle-relaxer or filler or a combination of the two?

A) Make sure the doctor is clear about the treatment, and what it will and won’t achieve for you. The treatment you’re seeking may not be a “surgical procedure,” but it still can have risks. So ask:

Q) What should I be concerned about with this treatment?

A) Determine if the risks, no matter how remote, outweigh the benefits. Plan ahead by asking:

Q) What’s the down-time or recovery period for the treatment?

A) Some treatments are “lunch-hour procedures,” and you can go straight back to work afterward. Others you may want to plan for. Scheduling a treatment the day before your school/college reunion may not be the best idea! Some treatments show immediate results while others take a few days, so ask your doctor:

Q) How long will it take to see the results?

A) Wrinkle-relaxing treatments can take a few days to “kick in,” and the full effects may not be visible for up a couple of weeks. Other treatments vary. Get specific by asking:

Q) How long will the effects of the treatment last?

A) The effects of some treatments last longer than others. Know what lies ahead. Not sure what to ask? Then ask:

Q) Do you have an information sheet on this treatment?

A) A printed information sheet about the procedure that your doctor is planning is helpful because you can take it home and think about the treatment. Some doctors will give you a printout of your overall treatment plan that may include other treatments such as cosmeceuticals and peels.

Finally, don’t forget to do your own research as well. Talk to friends and family and learn about the products from  authoritative sources.

Posted in Health & Beauty

About

Elizabeth Dawes-Higgs, M.D., is a dermatologist in practice on Sydney, Australia’s North Shore. She is an American Society for Dermatologic Surgery member and a Fellow of the Australian College of Dermatologists. Dr. Dawes-Higgs is actively involved in teaching and mentoring and has a degree in Medicine and a Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Sydney for her work in Biomechanics of Skin. Visit her website at http://www.dermatologist.com.au.

 

Jul 23 // 2013

Considering anti-wrinkle treatments? Ask these important questions first

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Great Ways to Relieve Dry Skin In the Summer


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The summer months are hot, humid and sunny. Here are some great tips to keep your skin looking moisturized, glowing and healthy.

  • Moisturize daily

Just because humidity is at its peak does not mean you can skip your moisturizer. Dry skin or eczema is due to problems with your skin’s moisture barrier, not the amount of moisture in the air. You might, however, be able to switch to a less greasy formula.

 

  • Control your climate

When you are indoors, keep your house and office cool if possible. Try using a fan if air conditioning isn’t available. Also, keep humidity to about 50 percent.

 

  • Wear your sunscreen!

You should wear sunscreen most of the time you’re outdoors. My favorite is Naked Turtle Sunscreen. It’s made by Dr. Gutierrez himself and is all-natural with no harsh chemicals. It’s also broad spectrum so it will protect you from the sun’s harsh rays. Remember to always avoid added perfumes, dyes, and alcohols.

 

  • Avoid antibacterial skin products

They kill off the very weak bacteria, which makes more room for other bacteria and fungi to grow.  The billions of bacteria that are normally on our skin actually help maintain the health of our skin. Opt for a moisturizing soap to wash off dirt and germs.

 

  • Dress to be cool

Choose loose cotton clothing in soft fabrics. Your summer style should keep you cool and avoid irritating your skin.

 

  • Rinse off when needed

Summer activities can expose you to pollen, sweat, salt, sand and chlorine. Take advantage of any outdoor showers at the beach and the pool. Cool water rinses and compresses are also a relief to irritated skin.

 

  • Manage allergies

If you have seasonal allergies, start taking your antihistamines just before the season begins. This will prepare your body for the onslaught.

 

 

 

 

 

Jul 18 // 2013

The summer months are hot, humid and sunny. Here are some great tips to keep your skin looking moisturized, glowing and healthy

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May is National Skin Cancer Awareness Month


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May is National Skin Cancer Awareness Month

Every hour, skin cancer claims another life     

                                                                                                                                                                             

What is Skin Cancer?

Cancer develops when DNA, the molecule found in cells that encodes genetic information, becomes damaged and the body cannot repair the damage. These damaged cells begin to grow and divide uncontrollably. When this occurs in the skin, skin cancer develops. As the damaged cells multiply, they form a tumor. Since skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis, the outermost layers of skin, a tumor is usually clearly visible. This makes most skin cancers detectable in the early stages.

Causes

Sun exposure is the leading cause of skin cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, “Many of the more than 1 million skin cancers diagnosed each year could be prevented with protection from the sun’s rays.” In some cases, skin cancer is an inherited condition. Between 5% and 10% of melanomas develop in people with a family history of melanoma.

Skin Cancer Prevention

Sun protection can significantly decrease a person’s risk of developing skin cancer. Sun protection practices include staying out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the rays are strongest, applying a broad-spectrum (offers UVA and UVB protection) sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or higher year-round to all exposed skin, and wearing a protective clothing, such as a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses when outdoors.

Early Detection

Since skin cancer is so prevalent today, dermatologists also recommend that everyone learn how to recognize the signs of skin cancer, use this knowledge to perform regular examinations of their skin, and see a dermatologist annually (more frequently if at high risk) for an exam. With early detection and proper treatment, skin cancer is highly curable. The average cure rate when detected and treated in the early stages is 95%. Even melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, when limited to the outermost layers of the skin yields a 95% cure rate.

How Skin Cancer is Diagnosed

Dermatologists detect skin cancer through a visual examination of the skin and mucous membranes. If malignancy (cancer) is suspected, a biopsy will be performed. This involves numbing the area and removing the lesion, or part of it, for microscopic examination. A biopsy is the only way to definitely tell if skin cancer is present. The removed sample is examined under a microscope to determine if cancer cells are present and if so which kind.

Treatment Options

If the biopsy reveals skin cancer, your dermatologist will discuss treatment options. Treatment for skin cancer varies according to the type, location, extent, aggressiveness of the cancer, and the patient's general health. The goals of treatment for skin cancer are to remove all of the cancer, reduce the chance of recurrence, preserve healthy skin tissue, and minimize scarring after surgery.

Melanoma

Accounting for about 4% of all diagnosed skin cancers, melanoma begins in the melanocytes, cells within the epidermis that give skin its color. Melanoma has been coined “the most lethal form of skin cancer” because it can rapidly spread to the lymph system and internal organs. In the United States alone, approximately one person dies from melanoma every hour. Older Caucasian men have the highest mortality rate. Dermatologists believe this is due to the fact that they are less likely to heed the early warning signs. With early detection and proper treatment, the cure rate for melanoma is about 95%. Once its spreads, the prognosis is poor. Melanoma most often develops in a pre-existing mole or looks like a new mole, which is why it is important for people to know what their moles look like and be able to detect changes to existing moles and spot new moles.

May 29 // 2013

May is National Skin Cancer Awareness Month

Every hour, skin cancer claims another life     

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Don't Fry Day


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Did you know that one in five children will grow up to develop skin cancer? As we approach sun season, it is important to use our heads and protect them, along with the rest of our skin. In the same way we teach kids to wear bike helmets, we can also teach them to wear wide-brimmed hats. One catch way to remember sun safety is: Slip, Slop, Slap® and Wrap.

-Slip on a shirt;

-Slop on some sunscreen;

-Slap on a wide-brimmed hat; and

-Wrap on some sunglasses.

Listen for the UV Index, and have fun in the shade between the hours of 10 and 4.

  • More than two million Americans get skin cancer each year, outnumbering breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancers combined.
  • One in five children will grow up to develop skin cancer.
  • Melanoma is the most common form of cancer for young adults 25-29 years of age.

Find out more at: www.skincancerprevention.org

 

May 23 // 2013

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Sunscreen~ What's changed and what you need to know


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New FDA rule governing sunscreens~ Whats changed and what you need to know~

The good news about the FDA’s new sunscreen rule is that you’ll find it easier to pick a trustworthy sunscreen.

You’re also going to get a lot of ‘reality check’ info on the back of your sunscreen product, lest you forget that the sun is bad for your skin.

All in all, the 2011 FDA ruling is a good thing, even if it’s not perfect!

The 5 key points that you need to know about the FDA’s new sunscreen rule:

This rule governs sunscreen labeling and effectiveness testing only.  The FDA still has to study specific ingredient safety (and hopefully stability).
The FDA has maxed the SPF at 50.  You won’t be seeing anymore SPF ‘infinity and beyond’.
The SPF value now also tells you if the sunscreen provides some ‘Broad Spectrum’ protection from UVA rays. In the past the SPF value just indicated UVB protection.  Now, if a product provides partial UVA protection it will be labeled Broad Spectrum SPF (with a #) PLUS both the UVA and UVB protection increase proportionally as the SPF number increases. (The problem is that the FDA only required partial UVA protection to win this claim so you still have to read labels and I discuss this more below!).
Water resistant sunscreens will be clearly labeled and you’ll know whether the protection lasts for 40 or 80 minutes. They also banned terms like waterproof, sweatproof, sun block.
Broad Spectrum SPF 15 or higher sunscreens will get to finally claim they help reduce skin cancer and premature skin aging. This is the best part of the FDA’s sunscreen rule!

First you need to know that sunscreen is considered a drug, meaning everything that’s in it or on the product package is regulated by the FDA! (In contrast to facial moisturizers, which are considered a cosmetic and are handled more loosely.) That’s why we’ve been waited for years for the FDA to make some needed changes.  They’ve gotten plenty of criticism and there’s been plenty controversy during the wait; we’ve bemoaned not having the ratings system or products available in Europe, the product testing methods in Australia and more recently additional analysis of sunscreen ingredient safety. This ruling makes some progress but we didn’t get everything.

You need to know, this new FDA rule change applies to sunscreen labeling and testing only!

The labeling (and testing) changes go into effect in June of 2012. Expect to see products gradually change labels up until then.  It’s a labeling rule, not a full FDA ‘monograph’ on sunscreens (a monograph is where they look at everything related to sunscreens).  This means there are things the FDA did not cover that people are clamoring for like ingredient safety.  That’s still to come, but the FDA felt there was a compelling need to straighten out the label mess so they moved forward with this before finalizing their monograph.

The BIG NEWS for  is that the FDA has come out and said that sun harms skin.

This is big!  The FDA says the science now conclusively proves that the sun’s UV radiation is harmful to your skin

It causes skin cancer, premature skin aging other important problems (like skin immunosuppression)
and consumers need good information now to help them better avoid UV sun ray exposure.

They think label changes will help.  They acknowledge that there is a public health need to give consumers better guidance for judging sun protection in sunscreens, and this is their goal.

To make product label information more straightforward the FDA:

Capped the SPF at 50,
Added some UVA protection to the definition of SPF and clarified water resistant sun protection.
Importantly, the FDA acknowledges that sunscreen alone is not sufficient for sun protection. They want to start reinforcing good sun protection practices, and they’re requiring that info on the back sunscreen labels too (such as avoiding excessive sun, especially mid-day, and wearing sun protective clothing).

What You Can Expect To See On Sunscreen Products After June 2012

On the front label you’ll find:

The products Broad Spectrum SPF number (or absence of the term ‘Broad Spectrum’ if it’s not!)
whether it provides water resistant protection, including how long that protection lasts (40 or 80 minutes)
On the back label you’ll find:

A lesson in sun protection
Good directions on how to correctly use a sunscreen
Warnings about the sun
A reminder not to bake your sunscreen in the sun or heat,
The concentration of the active ingredients (which you’ll need to check if you want complete UVA protection-see below).
You Need To Understand What Your Sunscreen Front Label Info Actually Means, and It’s Not All Good!

SPF values will be capped at 50 and this is BIG CHANGE #1

Love it or hate it, it’s here.

Products currently claiming an SPF over 50 will now be labeled 50+. (Only 2% of all products sold in the US today claim an SPF over 50, but some people love them.)  The FDA points out, that there is no clinical benefit to a properly applied sunscreen above SPF 50.  The key words are ‘properly applied’.

To understand why SPF 30, 50 and more don’t give you proportionally more protection read my post How High of an SPF Does Your Sunscreen Need To Have?

Higher SPF sunscreens do actually have higher concentration of active ingredients and if you don’t properly apply your product they may give you added protection. This means that if you don’t put enough sunscreen on, or don’t reapply it ever 2 hours, and after water contact, (like you’re supposed to) then there may be benefit to knowing how much higher than SPF 50 your product is.  Honestly though it gives you a false sense of security; patients tell me that they think they don’t need to reapply these super high SPF sunscreens as often and this isn’t true. We don’t know if they last longer or how much less you can apply and still get the minimum necessary SPF 15 …….so now there’s no chancing it, you’re just going to have to put enough on and reapply that sticky sunscreen as directed…….and follow the instructions for comprehensive sun protection on the back label of your sunscreen product.  SPF ‘infinity and beyond’ is gone!

The Broad Spectrum term will give you better (but not perfect) information about UVA protection and this is BIG CHANGE #2

Products that protect into the worst part of the UVA rays will be labeled Broad Spectrum SPF (with a number)

It will be easy to understand and better than what we have now.  It’s also a big change to wrap your head around.

In the past the term SPF only indicated UVB protection. Now SPF indicates UVA protection too, and the protection of both is proportional to the number; the greater the SPF the greater the protection for BOTH UVA and UVB!

What Is A Sunburn?

What Is A Tan?

Plus, the print and graphics will be regulated so that companies can’t pull any labeling shenanigans to trick you into misreading the information.  I like that this is simple and straightforward and you will be able to compare products easily.

The bottom line on the ‘Broad Spectrum’ labeling:  You still need to read ingredient labels if you want the best and most complete sun protection from your sunscreen. Look for 5% or higher concentrations of zinc oxide or European products with Mexoryl SX if you want a product that blocks ALL of UVA.

Of course anyone using my sunscreens already uses 5%+ zinc oxide products and is getting the best, full sun spectrum protection possible.

Water Resistance in sunscreens will be easier to understand

You need water resistant protection if you’re sweating or swimming.

Now you’ll clearly see water resistant sunscreens claiming that the stated SPF lasts when your wet for either

40 minutes
80 minutes
It will be right on the front of the product where it’s easy to find. You’ll even see reapplication instructions on the back label too.

To claim 40 or 80 minute protection the product must provide the same original SPF as proven by tests done on wet human subjects.  Interestingly, this testing involves immersion in water for 20 minutes, followed by drying off outside of water for 15 minutes, then back in the water for 20 and so on.  For 40 minutes that means two 20 minute immersions.  For 80 minutes that’s four 20 minute immersions and three 15 minute dry off periods.  The FDA feels that a 20 minute swim is pretty average for most people and so the testing methods mimic real life use.   I’d still recommend reapplying when you get out of the water because the testing is done in still water and most swimmers are agitating the water when they swim, especially at the beach where the water is moving on its own too.  Water movement is acknowledged to affect how well the product stays on your skin.  Australian water resistance testing is done in agitating water. I don’t find our water resistant sunscreens perform any less well that the Aussie ones so they probably stay on as well. I't recommend reapplying all water resistant sunscreens after toweling off regardless of the time.

Your going to get instructions for PROPER sunscreen application

You’ll be reminded to reapply every 2 hours.
Water resistant products will tell you to reapply after 40 or 80 minutes in the water and every 2 hours.
Non-water resistant products will tell you to reapply after towel drying, swimming or sweating.
You’ll also be reminded that you really should be using a water resistant sunscreen for swimming or sweating.
The FDA decided not to tell consumers how much sunscreen to put on but just to ‘apply liberally’.

Broad Spectrum SPF 15 or higher products will be required to give you more comprehensive advice for sun exposure.   The FDA want’s to make sure you’re totally clear on the fact that you can’t just slap on this product and stay all day in the direct sun without consequences. The FDA is rightfully concerned that you actually get more UV exposure using Broad Spectrum SPF 15+  sunscreens when you do this.  Sunscreens help prevent the sunburn that gets you out of the sun, tempting you to stay out longer.  Now you’re back label will remind you:

Sun Protection Measures.  Spending time in the sun increases your risk of skin cancer and early skin aging.  To decrease this risk, regularly use a sunscreen with a Broad Spectrum SPF value of 15 or higher and other sun protection measures including:

Limit time in the sun, especially from 10 a.m. -2 p.m.

Wear long-sleeved shirts, pants, hats and sunglasses

You’re also going to see an interesting warning that you may not already know about

Sunscreens break down when they get hot, yet you take them to hot and sunny places.  Now you’ll be reminded to protect your sunscreen product from excessive heat and direct sun! This is great because baking your sunscreen is never good-and it’s easy to do.

Your going to see a Skin Cancer/Skin Aging Alert to sober you up just in case you goofed and bought a wimpy sunscreen

Products that are not labeled ‘Broad Spectrum’ and /or have an SPF below 15 will actually have to sport the following warning.

“Skin Cancer/Skin Aging Alert: Spending time in the sun increases your risk of skin cancer and early skin aging.  This product has been shown only to help prevent sunburn, not skin cancer and early skin aging.“

The FDA wants to make it clear to you that these products will delay sunburn but they don’t lower your risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging.  Of course you should not buy or use these products!

You’ll find the percentages of active ingredients on the back label, and you’ll need this info

Because you are still going to need to look for 5%+ zinc oxide, titanium dioxide or Mexoryl SX to tell if you are getting protection from 370 to 400nm UVA rays you need to know that this info is on the back label.

A few final label changes aimed at reiterating the ‘reality check’ that sun isn’t good for your skin

All products will have a warning about the sun:  UV exposure from the sun increases the risk of skin cancer, premature skin aging, and other skin damage.  It is important to decrease UV exposure by limiting time in the sun, wearing protective clothing, and using a sunscreen.

The bottom line:

The 2011 FDA Sunscreen Rule is an improvement.

You’ll be better able to better judge a product facing you on a store shelf.
If you turn it around and look for zinc oxide, titanium dioxide or Mexoryl SX you’ll know if that broad spectrum protection includes all the bad UVA rays
You’re going to get the reality check about comprehensive sun safe behavior on the back of every product, and you should watch to see if the rest of the beach goers start practicing better comprehensive sun protection behavior over time.

 
 

 

May 22 // 2013

New FDA rule governing sunscreens~ Whats changed and what you need to know~

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Dr. Dinulos leads a genetic skin disorder forum.


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Dr. Dinulos leads a genetic skin disorder forum at this year's 71 annual American Academy of Dermatology meeting.

The American Academy of Dermatology is the largest, most infuential dermatology group in the United States.  With membership of more than 17,000, it represents virtually all practicing dermatologists in the United States, as well as a growing number of international dermatologists.

Dr. Dinulos practices adult, pediatric and cosmetic dermatology at Dermatology & Skin Health.  His genetic skin disorder expertise is a valuable resource for his patients and practice.

May 06 // 2013

Dr. Dinulos leads a genetic skin disorder forum at this year's 71 annual American Academy of Dermatology meeting.

The American Academy of Dermatology is the largest, most infuential dermatology group in the United States.  With membership of more than 17,000, it represents virtually all practicing dermatologists in the United States, as well as a growing number of international dermatologists.

Dr. Dinulos practices adult, pediatric and cosmetic dermatology at Dermatology & Skin Health.  His genetic skin disorder expertise is a valuable resource for his patients and practice.

 

 

 

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Apple Cider Vinegar Not Just for the Kitchen


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How can your skin benefit from Apple Cider Vinegar.....

Athletes foot:            Mix 3 parts vinegar with one part water and soak feet for 15 minutes once or twice a day.  It can help eliminate the fungus.

Bug Bites:                  Reduces itching and swelling of bug bites, expecially mosquito bites.

Smelly arm pits:       Sweat doesn't smell bad.  It's the bacteria that breaks down your sweat that does.  Rubbing apple cider vinegar on your pits can help kill bacteria and odor.

See more helpful ideas for your Hair and Skin

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/organic-authoritycom/apple-cider-vinegar-b...

 

 

 

 

 

Mar 26 // 2013

How can your skin benefit from Apple Cider Vinegar.....

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